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Protocols For Medevac Units?


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#1 NaCl

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Posted 30 January 2008 - 12:27 PM

Hi All,
I was wondering what your respective units employ for medical protocols, CQI, patient reporting, equipment selection and such?

Does the USAF have any proponency for doctrine in the air evacuation environment? The US Army has the USASAM, but it is rather weak and there is no system model or service-wide collaboration for MedEvac units.

Thanks.
Brian
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#2 OKANG FN

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Posted 30 January 2008 - 10:16 PM

Hi All,
I was wondering what your respective units employ for medical protocols, CQI, patient reporting, equipment selection and such?

Does the USAF have any proponency for doctrine in the air evacuation environment? The US Army has the USASAM, but it is rather weak and there is no system model or service-wide collaboration for MedEvac units.

Thanks.
Brian


In a nutshell...

Everything we do in AE is guided and directed by various Air Force Instructions (AFI's) and regulations. Air Mobility Command (AMC) is the MAJCOM that has control over AE, they write the AFI's and determine all of our requirements r/t training, protocols, etc. It provides continuity throughout the system for active duty, reserve and guard units.

I hope I'm on track with your question.
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#3 NaCl

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Posted 31 January 2008 - 10:09 PM

In a nutshell...

Everything we do in AE is guided and directed by various Air Force Instructions (AFI's) and regulations. Air Mobility Command (AMC) is the MAJCOM that has control over AE, they write the AFI's and determine all of our requirements r/t training, protocols, etc. It provides continuity throughout the system for active duty, reserve and guard units.

I hope I'm on track with your question.



You're definitely on track, sir. The Army has doctrine on the broad scope of 'medical evacuation' and tables of equipment allowances that define a baseline of what you have in terms of personnel, vehicles, supplies and equipment. Further, it has delineated many medical procedures from bandaging to surgery into standardized tasks. But it lacks any continuity in the application of such in the air medical environment.

Do the AFIs define actual therapies and drug dosages or simply mandate that such protocols be instituted at the unit level?

Specifically, many Army units have resorted to writing a local book of medical protocols to cover therapies that their particular flight surgeon deems efficacious and defines what privileges the flight medics may utilize. This is similar to what we in the civilian environment have from our medical director, et. al. I was wondering if anyone had considered sharing these documents for the better of the service?

Also...rant on--
Continuity is important, but non-existent in recent practice with Army MEDEVAC units. For example, many National Guard units draw on the extensive experience of their crews who bring civilian education and progress with them. Some active duty units aren't afforded the same luxury, and may have crews with little experience other than training, are detached from many of the hot items evolving in medicine, and lesser academic education. Sadly, this means that it is up to each unit to determine what its capabilities are.

While one unit may have personnel capable of providing CC level care, others are nothing past flying EMTs. Because of this disparity, when those particular units are called upon to evacuate an unstable or life-support dependent casualty from a battlefield MTF to say, the airfield where your CCATT will land at, they must take along an RN, PA or physician from the field unit. This now depletes the forward operation of an advanced provider simply because some flight medics in the Army MEDEVAC community are not trained or experienced at handling a critical patient after initial EMT care.
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#4 FlightMedic1

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Posted 06 October 2008 - 02:43 PM

If you want a basic example of medical protocols go to the USASAM website. If you have ideas of how they should be written and think you are up to it, create your own, get them approved and share. Every unit should have individual protocols to keep overzealous untrained medics from doing stupid things in the back of the acft. I agree 100% that most of todays active duty flight medics are not trained as well as Guard or Reserve. What commander is going to be able to send his medics to EMT-I/EMT-P school. It's not going to happen. Also active duty will not be able to keep the credentials due to deployments and the recert requirements. So to create protocols for paramedics, and the CDR signs off on them (their ATP) they would shoot themselves in the foot when a paramedic goes uncurrent. It is up to the flight surgeon the take an active role in training each medic that is assigned to them. We all know the flight surgeon really only works in the clinic and rarely even sees their medics. I saw my Bn flight surgeon twice while in Germany for 3 1/2 years. If you have ideas about the "weak" USASAM feel free to send them so they can improve, they have a reachback capability to make their courses better. It sounds like you have all the answers.
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