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91 Vs 135 Minimums Chart


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#1 Macgyver

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Posted 12 December 2007 - 08:15 AM

Preparing a topic for a staff meeting. Trying to decode the FAR's in an easy to read format :lol: Does anyone have a (or several) chart or table that compares FW and RW 91 vs 135 takeoff, landing, cruise flight and alternate airport minimum requirements? (for 'typical' as well as mountainous and uninhabited areas) Trying to explain why a part 91 FW can depart IFR with 500' and 1/4 mile (if they can) as an example. Even a link to an on-line tutorial (if one exists) would be a help to explain the requirements to non aviation people. Even after 12 years I know just enough to know that I haven't really got a good enough grasp on it to teach others... JW? Capt Morgan?
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Ken BHSc, RN, REMT-P

#2 AKCommSpec

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Posted 13 December 2007 - 07:01 PM

I sure would love to see the same thing. We're all the time having to explain to our sending clinics that we're on wx hold while they are sitting there watching commercial flights coming and going. It is frustrating sometimes, so a clear and concise explanation would be fantastic.

Thanks for asking the question!

Andrea
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#3 Mike Mims

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Posted 13 December 2007 - 08:46 PM

Preparing a topic for a staff meeting. Trying to decode the FAR's in an easy to read format :lol: Does anyone have a (or several) chart or table that compares FW and RW 91 vs 135 takeoff, landing, cruise flight and alternate airport minimum requirements? (for 'typical' as well as mountainous and uninhabited areas) Trying to explain why a part 91 FW can depart IFR with 500' and 1/4 mile (if they can) as an example. Even a link to an on-line tutorial (if one exists) would be a help to explain the requirements to non aviation people. Even after 12 years I know just enough to know that I haven't really got a good enough grasp on it to teach others... JW? Capt Morgan?

As far as I know there isn't a chart that exsist, at best you'll have to make one. Of course you need to supply the FAR part number and possiblt a link to it.

There are so many variable to consider. IFR, VFR , single engine, twin engine or more than three, day, night etc....

Good example:
Take-off and landing:
FW with one or two engines IFR - 1 statute mile
FW with more than two engines IFR - 1/2 statute mile
RW with one or two engines IFR - 1/2 statue mile no less than 1/4 statute
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Mike Mims

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#4 marcdurocher

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Posted 30 March 2008 - 04:01 AM

I still get in arguments with other pilots about this subject. We all seem to know our own niche very well, but would be best to stay out of other pilot's business. There are so many variables 91/135/fixedwing/rotorwing/class g airspace/class d airspace/company minimums/local company mimimums/new pilot minimums/backup aircraft minimums/and last but not least, each pilot's interpretation of all the said minimums! Good luck trying to explain it to non-pilots.

Marc D.
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Marc Durocher - Lifeflight Missoula Montana - Helicopter pilot

#5 Mike Mims

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Posted 30 March 2008 - 03:43 PM

I still get in arguments with other pilots about this subject. We all seem to know our own niche very well, but would be best to stay out of other pilot's business. There are so many variables 91/135/fixedwing/rotorwing/class g airspace/class d airspace/company minimums/local company mimimums/new pilot minimums/backup aircraft minimums/and last but not least, each pilot's interpretation of all the said minimums! Good luck trying to explain it to non-pilots.

Marc D.

Agreed.
I just say, www.FAA.gov and look for FAA regulations..............
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Mike Mims

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University of Mississippi Medical Center


#6 C3 Inc.

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Posted 29 October 2008 - 03:29 AM

Agreed.
I just say, www.FAA.gov and look for FAA regulations..............


Hit the 7th edit CAMTS guidelines, and it's free to download. (www.camts.org) There is a pretty good color coded chart on local/xcty flying area, day/night min's. I tried cut and pasting it into this forum and it got all out of whack in doing so. Hope that helps!
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Richard A. Patterson
MBA, NR/CCEMT-P, MICP, FP-C, CFI, CFII, AGI, IGI
Critical Care Concepts, Inc.
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#7 kidsrrtnps

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Posted 04 November 2008 - 02:22 PM

Hit the 7th edit CAMTS guidelines, and it's free to download. (www.camts.org) There is a pretty good color coded chart on local/xcty flying area, day/night min's. I tried cut and pasting it into this forum and it got all out of whack in doing so. Hope that helps!



I can't seem to find this on the CAMTS site?
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#8 Mike Mims

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Posted 04 November 2008 - 04:42 PM

I can't seem to find this on the CAMTS site?

Here's the link:
7th Edition 2006 Accreditation Standards

- Choose the middle download: (Accreditation Standards - 7th Edition 2006)
- It on page 56 of 79 with Adobe reader
or
- Rotorwing Standards; Weather
Certificate/Weather Section 11.01.03
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Mike Mims

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University of Mississippi Medical Center