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End Of The Day...


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#1 FlightRNEMTP

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Posted 16 August 2015 - 05:56 PM

Hello-

I'm curious to know if other programs have a stop time where you don't "launch" for a call. I'm really looking to hear from neo/peds specific, but welcome all GCCT responses. 

 

Example- If your shift ends at 0700 and a transport requests comes in at 0630, do you wait for your relief or do you go on the mission? 

 

I'd like to see what different services do. 

 

Thanks! 


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#2 medic87

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Posted 18 August 2015 - 06:38 PM

I don't know if this will help you, but for our program (RW) we do 12 and 24 hour shifts.  On our 12 hour shifts we work from 6-18 or 18-0600.  As a courtesy, the night shift will take any flight that originates after 1700 in the afternoon for the day shift, and the day shift will come in after 0500 if there is a flight that comes in during that final hour.  It helps so that each shift isn't "stuck" working much later than expected.  It isn't mandatory that we come in, but most all of us do.  It works great for us.  Hope that helps / makes sense.

 

Luke


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Luke Ballmer RN, BSN, CFRN, CCP

Good Samaritan AirCare

Kearney, Nebraska


#3 Carpe Diem

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Posted 19 August 2015 - 11:28 PM

as long as the medical crew/ pilot/EMT-driver will not exceed 14 hours, we will take the mission. 

 

This mirrors FAA rules of Pilot "pumpkin time" regarding 12 hour shifts and exceeding "safe" work hours. 

 

-Kris


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Kris


#4 Medic09

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Posted 30 August 2015 - 05:59 PM

FW here, but I've done ground EMS and think it's similar for this question.

 

A lot depends on the anticipated length of the transport.  If it means we'll run over-shift by an hour, two or even three - the present crew will take it.  (That's why we shouldn't plan anything important for the morning after the 24 hour shift.)  If it looks longer than that, then an oncoming crew will be called in early to take the transport.  We might call a crew in as much as three hours early or more, if the transport will be really long and run really late into the next day.  Many times these are planned transports that dispatch knows about the night before; so they can often call the next-day crew to give ample warning that they'll have to come in early.


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Mordechai Y. Scher
NRP, FP-C, RN

It's all about kind, competent patient care; and getting home safely to tell about it.


#5 brandon911

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Posted 10 September 2015 - 10:59 PM

We do it all different.  If the on coming crew is there or part of the on coming crew is there then they will take it.  If we get off at 1800 and a call comes in at 1750 and the on coming crew is not there yet we will take it.  The 14 hour rule really only applies to the pilot. 

 

brandon911


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