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Medical Crew Members Assist Pilots


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#21 medic4cqb

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Posted 22 February 2015 - 04:28 PM

In the original scenario, the (assumed) trained medical crew member ASSISTED the pilot and the outcome was a safe landing. Who would argue AGAINST having them trained, especially for emergencies? Part of the training should be to give information as requested, not just randomly shout out random frequencies and gauge readings. Training the medical crew to assist AS REQUESTED by the PIC has no downside that I can see.


USDalumn97,

That, was the point to the original post. Training the medical crew to assist as requested by the pilot, would be beneficial in my opinion and obviously the consensus agrees. No one needs additional responsibilities on a mission, but part of our job, is to adapt and overcome. At the end of the day, the mission truly is to get home safe.
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Steve A., RN, CCRN, EMT-P

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#22 HEMSLAWS

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Posted 15 April 2015 - 05:27 PM

I think John Wade is more offended that he is limited to saying no to a flight rather than being consulted on whether it should be taken or not.
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#23 Jwade

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Posted 15 April 2015 - 06:51 PM

Clearly, you have no data to support your flawed conclusion.....

 

Again, when you "professional pilots, with thousands of hours of experience" stop making poor decisions and stop making perfectly good aircraft lawn darts, maybe the medical crews will be more willing to mind their own business........Just saying..... B)


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John Wade MBA, CCEMT-P, FP-C, RN

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#24 HEMSLAWS

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Posted 16 April 2015 - 02:57 AM

Well, we say the same thing about the medical community too don't we? If you don't, you should. Why do you professional medical types with years of experience continue to make poor decisions and inflict unnecessary disaster on people's lives? Here's your stone.
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#25 Wally

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Posted 16 April 2015 - 02:32 PM

Clearly, you have no data to support your flawed conclusion.....

 

Again, when you "professional pilots, with thousands of hours of experience" stop making poor decisions and stop making perfectly good aircraft lawn darts, maybe the medical crews will be more willing to mind their own business........Just saying..... B)

 

Interesting that you believe the medical crew are also at fault when an accident occurs... That is what you're saying, right?


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#26 Jwade

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Posted 16 April 2015 - 07:59 PM

HEMS,

 

The difference is medicine is NOT an exact science, there is a lot of grey, people will continue to die despite doing everything correctly.....

 

There was no grey area on this most recent accident....The pilot should have stayed on the ground......

 

Wally,

 

The medical crew share responsibility for the poor decision making process.....Had either of them decided to stay on the ground the first time they landed and "checked the weather", we would not even be having this discussion......so, YES, i fully believe they share fault.  

 

Now, ultimate fault lies with the PIC obviously, his ego clearly outweighed his IFR skills / proficiency.............You can also lay blame on the company for poor recurrent training........Current does NOT equal proficient, no matter how many thousands of hours you might have under your belt.......


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John Wade MBA, CCEMT-P, FP-C, RN

"Have the courage to follow your heart and intuition, they somehow already know what you truly want to become" Steve Jobs

#27 McMedic828

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Posted 27 April 2015 - 01:58 AM

We as a HAA community have to get rid of the us and them attitudes. We are all there to perform a job and reach the same outcome, everyone returning home safely every time. Yes our jobs are different but decisions any of us make can affect the outcome of the flight good or bad. Mechanics have to have the pilots do a cya on their maitenance when done, so if a pilot can question the mechanic about his job performance and the maintenance he performed or do a double check to see it was done correctly then why would a pilot take offense if one of the medical crewmembers brought up a concern on accepting a flight? At no time should any crew member try to pressure someone into accepting a flight, but if a call comes in and there are thunderstorms in the area or questionable weather you can bet I will be asking the pilot about it before they accept or before we leave. My life as well as all aboard is ultimately in his hands once we are airborne and I have the right to know we are responding in a safe situation. Do I trust the judgement of the pilots I fly with, yes I do, but I will ask for clarification on conditions if something doesn't seem right to me as anyone should. As for the scenario in the original post it sounds like teamwork made for a good outcome in a poor situation. What it boils down to is we have to get out of the seperation of medical, pilots, and maintenance and do just the opposite and getting everyone to realize we all have to mesh as one.


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#28 VolandoP

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Posted 28 June 2015 - 05:47 PM

I have often though if I needed some heavy duty medical care/dental work it probably be worth flying to Thailand/Malaysia, stay in a nice place and get it done. Even if you include flights back I wouldnt be surprised if it was cheaper. Im lucky in that I rarely get ill and never majorly ill so dont have experience with this kind of thing but when I was getting a chest x-ray for my working holiday visa for Australia I got it done in Bangkok. The hospital there was the nicest hospital I have ever visited. I had to get another chest x-ray for 2nd year visa done in Brisbane Australia. It cost me 3 times as much as the facility was nowhere near as nice.
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