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Scenario Questions


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#1 CVICURN

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Posted 12 July 2014 - 03:11 PM

Hey guys.  I find myself in need of perspective.  I am preparing myself for an interview with the local flight program.  From friends that work there, I know they have a panel interview with clinical scenario questions.  The problem is that I do not do as well as I'd like with these questions.  If I read the same question, I can answer immediately with what I would do.  There is something with hearing it that causes me to answer slower and often in a less organized manner.  Anyway, does anyone have any good techniques for preparing for these questions aside from having my girlfriend read them to me?  Are there any good resources out there with scenario questions I could use to practice?  I'm currently studying the Holleran book to strengthen my weak areas and to learn some of the new concepts unique to transport.  Any advice on how to respond in a more concise and coherent manner would be appreciated.  I welcome any general interview advice as well.  Thanks!


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#2 medic4cqb

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Posted 12 July 2014 - 07:33 PM

   Funny, for me panel-type interviews aren't as stressful as test taking.  I'd rather explain answers verbally, because I can better put those types of questions into words. I love to write and can kind of be a bit wordy in explaining things I feel warrant a thorough explaination. I think you have the right idea in mind, by having your girlfriend drill you with scenario questions. I would add having a co-worker drill you with questions as well, because answering to someone you're more familiar with won't give you that same level of intensity as the real mccoy. Don't over think your answers to dig yourself into a ditch. You have the credentials and experience, let that and your personality sell you to the team. Good bro!


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Steve A., RN, CCRN, EMT-P

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#3 ForeverLearning

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Posted 13 July 2014 - 04:33 AM

I know they have a panel interview with clinical scenario questions.  The problem is that I do not do as well as I'd like with these questions. 

 

 

If that is the case reading more Holleran will do little for you. See if you can find a physician and ask him/her for a clinical scenario and your plan of action, treatment etc. Or ask those who have the job you want to practice with you. Do not ask a friend or a colleague who is clueless. 

 

During my medic clinicals after getting to know some of the Attending EM docs I would ask for one verbal scenario review (Medical, Trauma, Peds) after each rotation and post ask them what I need to improve. Actual testing day 101 with MD was smooth sailing. We are creatures of habit and it's very hard to step out of comfort zone but that is where character and experience is gained. 

 

As cheesy as this may sound you can read and learn all about how to seduce and attract women from books, videos etc. but until you muster up the balls to actually start approaching you won't be getting laid.  


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#4 CVICURN

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Posted 13 July 2014 - 07:13 AM

I think you both offer good advice.  It would be helpful to have someone I'm not as comfortable with ask me some scenarios.  I'm finding Holleran helpful for brushing up on areas I'm weaker in moreso than heping directly with scenarios.  I'm sure that I am overthinking it all to some extent, but I've always followed the 6 P's: proper preparation prevents piss poor performance.  Thanks again you two.  Good advice as always.


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#5 old school

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Posted 13 July 2014 - 12:34 PM

One thing to keep in mind that might reduce your stress level a little about these verbal scenarios is that they are used much more to learn about how you mentally approach clinical situations, than about whether or not you pick the same exact answer they would. The scenario is simply a tool for stimulating a discussion that allows them to get an idea about how you reason and think through things, and also your communication skills. It isn't like a multiple choice question where there is only one correct answer. 

 

Be prepared for questions that don't have an easy, clear-cut answer. I remember being given one where my partner and I strongly disagreed on the management of a patient, and being asked how I'd handle that. Situations where the sending physician wants you to do something that you deem harmful to the patient. You can't get ahold of med control, and your patient NEEDS something done that is not in your protocols. Questions about launching in marginal weather, where the pilot keeps saying "we'll be fine" but you disagree. Stuff like that. 

 

Be quick to use phrases like "I'd attempt to contact my med control physician, or the receiving physician" and "no matter what, I'd have to default to whatever action I think is in the patients' best interest". If you really get stuck, "without actually being in this difficult situation, knowing the personalities involved, the culture of the program and the protocols and the expectations of the leadership and the receiving physicians, it's hard to come up with a good answer" is probably not what they want to hear, but is better than just shrugging your shoulders and giving up on answering.

 

I agree that having someone familiar with this format help you practice is probably a good idea. 


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bring it in for the real thing

#6 SerendepitySaki

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Posted 13 July 2014 - 04:00 PM

shades of bull durham, old school...  love it....   ;-) 

and I think I have shared these case studies with you before, but just in case....

 

http://www.reachair....se-studies.html

 

also a tonne of free neonatal cases on one of the pages I run on facebook....

https://www.facebook...f_type=bookmark


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LET THE WILD RUMPUS BEGIN !!!!!!
Sean G. Smith, RN-Alphabet Soup

#7 flightrrt

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Posted 14 July 2014 - 02:19 AM

I think this is an excellent question.  My advice to any type of interview is the following:

 

1) Always, always, ALWAYS bring a pen and a pad of paper with you. 

2) At the beginning of the interview, as the interviewer if they mind if you take notes during the interview.  I have never had an interviewer tell me that they didn't want me to take notes.  Also, it shows the interviewer that you are being active during the interview.

3) Do the same during your scenario interviews.  Again, ask the interviewers if they mind of you take notes.  You may want to pose it as if they were giving you report on a patient, you would likely be taking notes when you receive report.

4) Take notes of the same things that you would take notes about during the receiving of report.

 

I think that putting it down on paper will help you recognize and prioritize your care in providing the interviewer with your response.  Besides letting the interviewer know what you are going to do, make sure that you provide them with your reasoning on why you are performing a particular action.  Anybody can memorize an algorithm, but it is the analysis that brings things to a much higher level and shows your skills.  The word, "because" should become your best friend.  For every response that you give, you should include a because statement after your action.


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Aaron J. Lund, JD, LL.M., CHC, CHPC, CHRC, RRT-NPS
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Former, Flight Respiratory Therapist

#8 CVICURN

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Posted 14 July 2014 - 09:59 PM

The reason I keep coming back to this forum is the quality of the information here and the willingness of the members to help each other out.  Again, I am indebted to you all for the helpful advice.  I love the suggestion of taking notes.  Not only would it allow me to be proactive, it would help bridge the gap between hearing a scenario and reading one. 

 

Sean, thanks for the case studies.  I think I've lost those links over the years.  Let me know if you're ever in Indianapolis, pretty sure I owe you a beer from our last meeting.

 

I hadn't thought about scenario questions being more about my thinking process than actual knowledge.  It makes sense, but just never clicked to me before.  Thank you for educating me.  The difficult to answer questions are always good interview material to put the interviewee in a tough spot.  Thanks again everyone!


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#9 SerendepitySaki

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Posted 15 July 2014 - 12:45 AM

yeppers.  I just gave you some cases, but there's some good advice posted in this thread.   good luck!


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LET THE WILD RUMPUS BEGIN !!!!!!
Sean G. Smith, RN-Alphabet Soup