Jump to content


Photo

Testing/interview Coming Up


  • Please log in to reply
8 replies to this topic

#1 8jimi8

8jimi8

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 19 posts

Posted 11 January 2014 - 09:24 PM

Good Afternoon,

I believe it has been a few years since I last posted.

I am excited to have been invited to interview for a flight team and received a list of resources to study. Beyond my advanced/peds advanced life support and NRP books, does anyone have an online resource for critical care paramedic? This along with the standard paramedic resources was listed. I don't have the exact 5 book series that was cited, is Caroline's work insufficiently different?. Also, where can i look for flight physiology, is this subject typically covered in the hiring examinations?
  • 0

#2 Jwade

Jwade

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1405 posts

Posted 11 January 2014 - 09:40 PM

Good Afternoon,

I believe it has been a few years since I last posted.

I am excited to have been invited to interview for a flight team and received a list of resources to study. Beyond my advanced/peds advanced life support and NRP books, does anyone have an online resource for critical care paramedic? This along with the standard paramedic resources was listed. I don't have the exact 5 book series that was cited, is Caroline's work insufficiently different?. Also, where can i look for flight physiology, is this subject typically covered in the hiring examinations?


You will need this book more than any other.

Air & Surface Transport Principles

If you are a paramedic with only 911 experience, i imagine the exam for the interview is going to be very tough. Here is a CCT book that should also help.

Critical Care Transport

You should also check out the latest CAMTS guidelines as well.

CAMTS

Your basic ACLS / PALS / NRP will not help much. It is expected that you should know that stuff like the back of your hand without fail. Ideally you should be holding instructor status in them as well.

Last, go to Will Wingfields site and buy his ACE-SAT book and / or watch his CCT videos for the flight world. He is the gold standard period for getting people ready for the CFRN / FP-C exams.

ResQShop

Also, go to the search function on this site and peruse the previous threads on interviews. These questions are exhaustively detailed for you, with sample interview questions.

Here are some to get you started.
1. Why are manhole covers round?

2. Explain the 2nd law of thermodynamics and how that relates to operational control and relationships with fellow co-workers.

THE FOLLOWING IS REPOSTED FROM A PREVIOUS THREAD I WROTE THIS FOR:

1. Please tell me about who you are as a person, who you want to be, where you come from, etc........ ( This gives me a chance to see if your comfortable speaking about yourself, do the answers come naturally or do you need to search)

2. Scenario question: You are called to the scene of a mass casualty accident on a desolated road in the mountains, there are 6 patients, 2 dead, 3 critical and 1 BLS, your helicopter is the first ALS on scene, the BLS fire volunteers rush a patient to your helicopter before you even get the door open, ( 1 of the 3 critical). They tell you to hurry up and load and go and fly back for the others....What do you do? Do you leave the scene with your patient?

3. What do you bring to this company that the other 30 applicants do not?

4. How does a ventilator actually deliver a breath to the patient? ( Don't guess, look it up,)

5. Here is a 12 lead EKG, please evaluate the 12 lead, ask any questions you need, and describe your TX plan in detail

6. What are your expectations for this job and how can we make you successful in your job.

7. Describe your greatest asset.

8. Describe your greatest weakness.

9. Have you ever been fired from a job? Why?

10. Have you ever had a disagreement with a co-worker and / or supervisor? How did you resolve the situation? What if you could not resolve it? What additional steps would you take?

11. You have witnessed your flight partner diverting narcotics. What would you do?

12. Do you know anything about aviation?

13. Please describe Boyles Gas Law in detail and how it applies to this job?

14. Scenario question: I hand you a detailed critical care scenario with a patient on a ventilator who is not doing well, I then hand you a set of blood gases, please tell me how you would adjust the vent settings to optimize this patient for transport to the next facility.

15. If i spoke to any of your friends, how would they describe you as a person?

16. Give an example of when you had an unexpected situation happen and how you resolved it.

17. Describe your long term goals and your contingency plan if these goals are not met during this specific time frame.

18. What educational goals have you attained beyond a basic paramedic or nurse that make you an attractive candidate for this job?

19. Please tell me everything you know about our company. ( If you have not taken the time to research before your interview, this question will kill you pretty quick)

20. Scenario question: You have just dropped a patient off at the hospital, its 5am, you are off shift at 6am, you have a 20 minute flight back to base, there is major convective activity in the area, but the pilot says if we leave now, we can beat the weather back to base before it goes below minimums....You look up, you see lightning in the distance, you look at your partner who says lets go, but something tells you maybe this isn't such a good idea. How do you resolve your differences?

21. Please describe Daltons Gas Law and how it affects your patient at altitude.

22. What is an ACE inhibitor?

23. Have you worked in a team environment? What were your specific contributions?

24. What do you do to relieve stress?

25. How do you define success?


Make sure you use OBJECTIVE statements only to describe you when asked. Something that is measurable and verifiable. Stay away from subjective descriptions, this will only lead you down a tough interview. For example, If i ask you to who you are and how would you describe yourself. DON'T tell me you are a natural leader, work well under stress, proven ability to lead, etc..........Because, when you give me subjective information, my next question to you is going to be: Ok, you say you have the proven ability to lead, please give me two examples when you have accomplished this. The point being here, you are potentially giving an interviewer rope to hang you with so to speak. Interviewers love to do this......Stay away from the trap.....
  • 0
John Wade MBA, CCEMT-P, FP-C, RN

"Have the courage to follow your heart and intuition, they somehow already know what you truly want to become" Steve Jobs

#3 8jimi8

8jimi8

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 19 posts

Posted 11 January 2014 - 09:48 PM

You will need this book more than any other.

Air & Surface Transport Principles

If you are a paramedic with only 911 experience, i imagine the exam for the interview is going to be very tough. Here is a CCT book that should also help.

Critical Care Transport

You should also check out the latest CAMTS guidelines as well.

CAMTS

Your basic ACLS / PALS / NRP will not help much. It is expected that you should know that stuff like the back of your hand without fail. Ideally you should be holding instructor status in them as well.

Last, go to Will Wingfields site and buy his ACE-SAT book and / or watch his CCT videos for the flight world. He is the gold standard period for getting people ready for the CFRN / FP-C exams.

ResQShop

Also, go to the search function on this site and peruse the previous threads on interviews. These questions are exhaustively detailed for you, with sample interview questions.

Here are some to get you started.
1. Why are manhole covers round?

2. Explain the 2nd law of thermodynamics and how that relates to operational control and relationships with fellow co-workers.

THE FOLLOWING IS REPOSTED FROM A PREVIOUS THREAD I WROTE THIS FOR:

1. Please tell me about who you are as a person, who you want to be, where you come from, etc........ ( This gives me a chance to see if your comfortable speaking about yourself, do the answers come naturally or do you need to search)

2. Scenario question: You are called to the scene of a mass casualty accident on a desolated road in the mountains, there are 6 patients, 2 dead, 3 critical and 1 BLS, your helicopter is the first ALS on scene, the BLS fire volunteers rush a patient to your helicopter before you even get the door open, ( 1 of the 3 critical). They tell you to hurry up and load and go and fly back for the others....What do you do? Do you leave the scene with your patient?

3. What do you bring to this company that the other 30 applicants do not?

4. How does a ventilator actually deliver a breath to the patient? ( Don't guess, look it up,)

5. Here is a 12 lead EKG, please evaluate the 12 lead, ask any questions you need, and describe your TX plan in detail

6. What are your expectations for this job and how can we make you successful in your job.

7. Describe your greatest asset.

8. Describe your greatest weakness.

9. Have you ever been fired from a job? Why?

10. Have you ever had a disagreement with a co-worker and / or supervisor? How did you resolve the situation? What if you could not resolve it? What additional steps would you take?

11. You have witnessed your flight partner diverting narcotics. What would you do?

12. Do you know anything about aviation?

13. Please describe Boyles Gas Law in detail and how it applies to this job?

14. Scenario question: I hand you a detailed critical care scenario with a patient on a ventilator who is not doing well, I then hand you a set of blood gases, please tell me how you would adjust the vent settings to optimize this patient for transport to the next facility.

15. If i spoke to any of your friends, how would they describe you as a person?

16. Give an example of when you had an unexpected situation happen and how you resolved it.

17. Describe your long term goals and your contingency plan if these goals are not met during this specific time frame.

18. What educational goals have you attained beyond a basic paramedic or nurse that make you an attractive candidate for this job?

19. Please tell me everything you know about our company. ( If you have not taken the time to research before your interview, this question will kill you pretty quick)

20. Scenario question: You have just dropped a patient off at the hospital, its 5am, you are off shift at 6am, you have a 20 minute flight back to base, there is major convective activity in the area, but the pilot says if we leave now, we can beat the weather back to base before it goes below minimums....You look up, you see lightning in the distance, you look at your partner who says lets go, but something tells you maybe this isn't such a good idea. How do you resolve your differences?

21. Please describe Daltons Gas Law and how it affects your patient at altitude.

22. What is an ACE inhibitor?

23. Have you worked in a team environment? What were your specific contributions?

24. What do you do to relieve stress?

25. How do you define success?


Make sure you use OBJECTIVE statements only to describe you when asked. Something that is measurable and verifiable. Stay away from subjective descriptions, this will only lead you down a tough interview. For example, If i ask you to who you are and how would you describe yourself. DON'T tell me you are a natural leader, work well under stress, proven ability to lead, etc..........Because, when you give me subjective information, my next question to you is going to be: Ok, you say you have the proven ability to lead, please give me two examples when you have accomplished this. The point being here, you are potentially giving an interviewer rope to hang you with so to speak. Interviewers love to do this......Stay away from the trap.....




John,

Thanks again in helping me prepare! I appreciated your resume help back in October!
  • 0

#4 Gila

Gila

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 588 posts

Posted 11 January 2014 - 11:33 PM

I have never heard of a thermodynamics and co-worker/operations question? Diving into the second law is a highly complicated process and involves a really good understanding of information theory, heat transfer, state variables and so on. I have had some thermodynamics and kinetics and I am not sure I could really do it any justice. Even the most simplistic examples using isothermal processes require at least a basic understanding of several concepts.
  • 0
Christopher Bare
"Non fui, fui, non sum, non curo "

#5 Jwade

Jwade

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1405 posts

Posted 12 January 2014 - 01:23 AM

I have never heard of a thermodynamics and co-worker/operations question? Diving into the second law is a highly complicated process and involves a really good understanding of information theory, heat transfer, state variables and so on. I have had some thermodynamics and kinetics and I am not sure I could really do it any justice. Even the most simplistic examples using isothermal processes require at least a basic understanding of several concepts.



Gila,

You are overthinking the question. We don't expect most medical people to be able to answer the question. It's called a " Nuisance Question" Simply given to ascertain if people are going to try and BS their way through the question or simply say they don't know. ( Which, would be the preferred response FYI) I certainly could not do it justice either in it's true chemical form, however, we did spend some time on how entropy and business / economic processes go hand in hand as this has been adapted from thermodynamics into other fields.

Almost every fortune 500 / 100 company throws random questions like this into their interview process simply to gauge how an individual will respond. You should see the list of questions Google and Facebook give their potential recruits....BRUTAL!

It is how most MBA grads get weeded out in these type of companies when they apply. However, the concept can apply to any discipline and IMO medical people are known for trying to BS their way through when they know a little about a subject.
  • 0
John Wade MBA, CCEMT-P, FP-C, RN

"Have the courage to follow your heart and intuition, they somehow already know what you truly want to become" Steve Jobs

#6 Iainhol

Iainhol

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 51 posts

Posted 12 January 2014 - 01:59 AM

John is referring to a couple interview theories.

One is to continue to push your knowledge until you are either guessing, working it out, or stating you do not know. It shows your knowledge base, problem solving skills and if you are willing to admit you don't know. My friend is an airline pilot and this is a common skill they use. The trick is to study up to know enough to begin with, if you are able to critically think through it do that, otherwise just be honest and say I do not know. Someone who has been at a higher level than you for 10 years will always know more - no shame in taking a new position with the notion that you don't know it all.

Secondly companies ask random questions to see how your mind works. JetBlue used to ask 'How many quarter would you need to reach the height of the empire states building?' some people might say a quarter is approximately 3/4 of an inch in diameter, and the empire states building is approximately 100 stories, with 12 foot per story, someone else might say it is $27 to get to the observation deck therefore 27*4, lastly someone might say I can climb a mountain for free - therefore none. Some are more unique, Mastercard asked 'Can you say: ’Peter Pepper Picked a Pickled Pepper’ and cross-sell a washing machine at the same time?' and google asked 'How many cows are in Canada'. The main process through these ones, is to come up with a reasonable answer and not appear stumped, or reply I do not know. For the master card one, you could reply of course, clean clothes sell washing machines, therefore if my clothes are clean what comes out my mouth isn't important. For Google, you could reply that you have never heard them running out of steak so obviously enough.

I have no experience with specific flight interviews, but that is some insight into both of those.
  • 0

#7 ForeverLearning

ForeverLearning

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 382 posts

Posted 12 January 2014 - 07:33 AM

Id get the FCCS book it's high yield and covers all important stuff by SCCM and if you can try to get into FCCS course or do their online program.

http://www.sccm.org/...-Resources.aspx


Critical Care Transport AAOS book is pure garbage and I would not advice you to waste your money. Astna book is better and covers flight.

Not sure what type of CCT experience you posses but if you never done transport work before all these books maybe be overkill. Truly there is no such a thing as critical care paramedic resources and books? (this is a joke), there is critical care medicine and its application to the transport environment.
  • 0

#8 8jimi8

8jimi8

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 19 posts

Posted 15 January 2014 - 06:17 AM

Id get the FCCS book it's high yield and covers all important stuff by SCCM and if you can try to get into FCCS course or do their online program.

http://www.sccm.org/...-Resources.aspx


Critical Care Transport AAOS book is pure garbage and I would not advice you to waste your money. Astna book is better and covers flight.

Not sure what type of CCT experience you posses but if you never done transport work before all these books maybe be overkill. Truly there is no such a thing as critical care paramedic resources and books? (this is a joke), there is critical care medicine and its application to the transport environment.



The panel was a very welcoming and relaxed atmosphere. That is the impression that was left on me from day 1 minute 1. Everyone is extremely professional and welcoming. The team members that I interacted with were overly grateful of "my" time and I tried to reiterate my mutual gratitude for the opportunity. The interview questions were posed without any pressure or intimidation and the atmosphere was quite welcoming and family like. This is a place that I would gladly make my home. I'm still in continual mantra with the universe.... PLEASE let me get this! Thank you to everyone who contributed in helping me prepare. Especially Mr. Wade, who has gone above and beyond to help a stranger. I will pay it forward.
  • 0

#9 gamedic2007

gamedic2007

    Newbie

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 9 posts

Posted 05 August 2014 - 09:59 PM

I definitely recommend Meducation Specialists as well. I am gonna take my FP-C and CFRN later this year. I have already interviewed with Guardian Flight and was told I knew what I was doing, and that I was in my comfort zone. Little did they knew I was sweating it badly. I am still waiting to hear back from them, and currently have an Interview for another job with another flight service as well. Hopefully, I will be flying very soon. I cant apply for a flight nurse job yet, but I can apply for a Flight Medic job.

 

FYI:

7 years exp as a Medic, some Remote Medical Assignments, some CCT exp.

2.5 years as a Nurse, ER/ICU. Some travel ER assignments. Currently in a CCU and we get some CABG patients as well.

CPR, ACLS, PALS, ITLS, PITLS, AMLS, and EPC Instructor Cards.


  • 0