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Blood Coolers


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#1 Carpe Diem

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Posted 14 March 2013 - 04:49 PM

Hey guys,
What are people using for their coolers for RW transports with blood products on board? Trying to get ideas for a portable cooler for my team as we start looking to add blood products to our arsenal.

-carpe diem
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Kris


#2 matt77

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Posted 14 March 2013 - 04:56 PM

Here's a link to the container we currently use.

http://www.mnthermal...eries-4-248-emt

Thanks,

Matt
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#3 onearmwonder

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Posted 14 March 2013 - 05:03 PM

Hey Matt let me ask you this? When do you turn your blood back in during shift?
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#4 matt77

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Posted 14 March 2013 - 06:03 PM

Technically we have our own blood bank at the hangar (2 3-unit block releases in a lab fridge with remote temperature monitoring to the hospital's blood bank). The blood and cooler inserts stay in the fridge till we have a request.
The blood storage setup requires a lot of paperwork and the lab folks have good reason to have very little tolerance for mistakes. If you were to trade out units per shift at the hospital's blood bank I would imagine that once per shift would keep the blood within the temperature range with an acceptable margin of safety.

Thanks,

Matt
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#5 onearmwonder

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Posted 14 March 2013 - 11:50 PM

Sorry that was for Carpe..
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#6 onearmwonder

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Posted 15 March 2013 - 04:41 PM

Hey Matt there is a medical director in ABQ who has helped develope a system to where he is able to pick up some units of blood in a cooler from his blood bank at UNM within 20 minutes of requesting them and respond to a prehospital scene call where there may be possible benefits of administering blood products to patients. Obviously there are only a small hand full of situations where someone may benefit from this, but the point is is that it was super easy to get this setup with his blood bank. It works well because the coolers that the blood comes in is rated to keep the blood at the appropriate temp for 48 hours granted you don't leave them in a vehicle with out temp control. So when he is done with the call he just simply turns them back in. Now this is a rough summary of how the process got started and works, but he did say that once that facts were all laid out on the table, the blood bank was eagerly on board. I say this because if you have the right resources and relationship in your blood bank, you may not have to buy expensive coolers. They don't in ABQ, NM... I will try to get you the MD's info.

Matt
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#7 Carpe Diem

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Posted 15 March 2013 - 08:25 PM

Thanks for the posts so far. My program is in the information gathering stage, but it is a high priority.

For our ground trucks, we have coolers already in use for chilled fluids for hypothermia induction. We are planning on utilizing those with the addition of a transponding thermometer to keep track of our temperatures. The hand-offs would be from crew to crew at change of shift, so that the products are never unattended to or inadvertently found out of temperature range.

Working on what the blood bank will and will not allow. But that is another story....

Keep if coming guys, if you have information that is relevant to finding coolers, and even transponding thermometers.

cheers,

carpe diem
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Kris


#8 Badwedge

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Posted 08 May 2013 - 03:32 PM

We keep 2 units of PRBC's at all times in our base in a fridge with remote monitoring by the blood bank. And trust me they do call if it alarms when the door gets left ajar. As we get toned out for a flight it's packed in protected ice packs with a gel thermometer pack in a regular cooler. If we use it great, its replaced via the usual channels in the bank with labels etc.. If it for some reason hits >5C we exchange it. This system has worked well for us for almost 20 years. Regards John.
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#9 airheadnurse

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Posted 19 February 2014 - 04:42 PM

Hey guys,
What are people using for their coolers for RW transports with blood products on board? Trying to get ideas for a portable cooler for my team as we start looking to add blood products to our arsenal.

-carpe diem


We fly with Polar Bear soft sided cooler- 12 pack size. It is an outstanding product. I did a lot of research when looking for a replacement product to our traditional hard sided coolers that we have used for 20+ years and this was by far the best product. This cooler is super insulated and guaranteed to keep ice frozen for 24 hours at 100 degrees F outside temp. Relatively inexpensive,(60$) I contacted the company asking for a discount and they donated 6 to us Plus they added our program name and logo for free! Most days, we check and pack the blood, meds and cold saline in the AM with 2 ice packs into the cooler, store the whole bag in the blood fridge and just grab and go for a call. This saves a few out the door minutes which is always good! Even in the heat of summer after multiple flights we rarely have to switch out the ice packs. We have had these new coolers for 1 year at 5 bases and have never had a single temp related issue (we keep and monitor a thermometer inside the bag) Plus the I like the additional fact that they are a soft sided product, easily secured into the AC and less of a projectile hazard.
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#10 airheadnurse

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Posted 19 February 2014 - 04:42 PM

Hey guys,
What are people using for their coolers for RW transports with blood products on board? Trying to get ideas for a portable cooler for my team as we start looking to add blood products to our arsenal.

-carpe diem


We fly with Polar Bear soft sided cooler- 12 pack size. It is an outstanding product. I did a lot of research when looking for a replacement product to our traditional hard sided coolers that we have used for 20+ years and this was by far the best product. This cooler is super insulated and guaranteed to keep ice frozen for 24 hours at 100 degrees F outside temp. Relatively inexpensive,(60$) I contacted the company asking for a discount and they donated 6 to us Plus they added our program name and logo for free! Most days, we check and pack the blood, meds and cold saline in the AM with 2 ice packs into the cooler, store the whole bag in the blood fridge and just grab and go for a call. This saves a few out the door minutes which is always good! Even in the heat of summer after multiple flights we rarely have to switch out the ice packs. We have had these new coolers for 1 year at 5 bases and have never had a single temp related issue (we keep and monitor a thermometer inside the bag) Plus the I like the additional fact that they are a soft sided product, easily secured into the AC and less of a projectile hazard.
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#11 hpcfrn

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Posted 20 February 2014 - 02:15 AM

Hey guys,
What are people using for their coolers for RW transports with blood products on board? Trying to get ideas for a portable cooler for my team as we start looking to add blood products to our arsenal.

-carpe diem


We have used the Minnesota Thermal products for years with no issues. Great product to carry both blood and chilled saline.
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Howard Polden RN, CFRN, CMTE, NREMT
Flight Nurse
Travis County STAR Flight
Austin, Texas