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Which Helicopter Do You Use?


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#1 R. Hedge RRT

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Posted 15 February 2013 - 12:39 PM

We are trying to get a benchmark of what most teams are doing as far as neo/ peds flight model.

1.) Which rotor wing unit are you using to transport neonates in isolettes?

2.) What challenges do you face with the type of helicopter you are in?


Thanks for your input.
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Robert Hedge, RRT, C-NPT

Neo/ Peds Team - Carilion Clinic Children's Hospital
Roanoke, Va


#2 Mike Mims

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Posted 16 February 2013 - 02:39 PM

1.) Which rotor wing unit are you using to transport neonates in isolettes?
We have an EC145 and a 135.


2.) What challenges do you face with the type of helicopter you are in?
EC145 - no challenges.
- Lots of room where you can get to the isolette front and back.
- You can be comfortably seated to the side of the isolette.
- Loading height for the isolette (the 145's isolette has it's own Ferno stretcher)

EC135 - the opposite of the 145...
- Not much room. Almost impossible to access anything from the back. (Where the O2 and airtanks are, O2/air blender, connections for vent circuit) Front there's not much leg room as well.
- You CAN sit beside the isolette, but not much space.
- Loading is horrible. I'm 6'1" and regardless of the stretcher used, it's difficult.
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Mike Mims

Aircare

University of Mississippi Medical Center


#3 TexRNmedic

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Posted 17 February 2013 - 02:35 PM

1.) Which rotor wing unit are you using to transport neonates in isolettes?
We have an EC145 and a 135.


2.) What challenges do you face with the type of helicopter you are in?
EC145 - no challenges.
- Lots of room where you can get to the isolette front and back.
- You can be comfortably seated to the side of the isolette.
- Loading height for the isolette (the 145's isolette has it's own Ferno stretcher)

EC135 - the opposite of the 145...
- Not much room. Almost impossible to access anything from the back. (Where the O2 and airtanks are, O2/air blender, connections for vent circuit) Front there's not much leg room as well.
- You CAN sit beside the isolette, but not much space.
- Loading is horrible. I'm 6'1" and regardless of the stretcher used, it's difficult.

I agree with Mike. We use a stretcher mounted isolette in EC145s with room for three med crew. I'm 6'4" and have enough leg room to sit comfortably at the head of the isolette.
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Wes Seale
Houston , TX

#4 Richard

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Posted 22 February 2013 - 06:43 AM

We use the Airborne Aviator w/ Ferno Mod 28. It is a custom design for the EC135. I find the 3rd swivel seat the best place to sit. Access to the infant remains a challenge in any smaller AC. My first was a Hughes 500 where the RT had to lean back over the front seat to access the patient.
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Richard P. Mitchell, RRT-NPS
Pediatric Respiratory Therapist
Vidant Medical Center, Greenville, NC and
HHS/OS/ASPR/OPEO/NDMS/DMAT-NC1 & MAC-ST

#5 StFuz

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Posted 01 March 2013 - 11:52 PM

Worked many places so here goes the list

Bell 407
1) Isollette calls are very tight. I am talking the kind of tightness where you know what religion your partner is tight. If the neo codes, you are screwed. Not able to take a parent back unless they sign the form to be strapped to the skids. Real hard for post C section mommies. No room for extra equipment what so ever.
2) Pedi stretcher calls are a little better. Sat behind the patient in the airway seat. Can not access anything below the waist of the patient. If you take a family member, still not much room for extra equipment
3) She is a awesome in the Texas heat

Bell 412
1) Enough room to do anything!!!

Bell 430
1) Easy access to anything
2) Plenty of room for stretcher and isollette calls

EC 145
1) Again, enough room to do anything.

Now if you are asking me my opinion on what would be the best rotor airframe to use for a neonatal pediatric transport team with room to do ANYTHING and here is the blank check?

Agusta Westland AW139 That right there is a work horse. Enough room for 5 attendees all around the patient. Man, Maryland is one lucky state to have those. I am very jealous of them.

Sorry. just my 2 cents and you got them for free.

Fly Safe
Fuz
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#6 kidsrt

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Posted 09 March 2013 - 11:00 PM

Rotor wing only in Astar

Lousy access to patient for one crewmember and virtually no access for the other crewmember sitting behind pilot,

No easy access to supplies/equipment

At night lights are worrisome do you want to see patient or fight reflections looking out

Poor access to o2/air tanks located on other end of isolette
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