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How To Better Prepare Myself?


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#1 ActionGoose

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Posted 03 October 2012 - 07:18 PM

I am a ground paramedic, in my third year as a paramedic and my 10th as an EMT. I currently work at a busy predominantly 911 system in a suburban area.

My goal is to fly, and I will do whatever I need to do to accomplish this. I have been studying for my FP-C, and hope to complete it by the year's end. In addition, I have current ATLS, PHTLS, ACLS, PALS and ABLS, as well as difficult airway. I will be taking the next NRP course offered.

What else should I be doing in the meantime to help differentiate myself from the plethora of candidates?
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#2 Jwade

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Posted 03 October 2012 - 07:52 PM

I am a ground paramedic, in my third year as a paramedic and my 10th as an EMT. I currently work at a busy predominantly 911 system in a suburban area.

My goal is to fly, and I will do whatever I need to do to accomplish this. I have been studying for my FP-C, and hope to complete it by the year's end. In addition, I have current ATLS, PHTLS, ACLS, PALS and ABLS, as well as difficult airway. I will be taking the next NRP course offered.

What else should I be doing in the meantime to help differentiate myself from the plethora of candidates?



As I said to the other guy who just posted the same question from the RN perspective. Use the search function and read all of the previous threads on these subjects.......All your questions will be answered........

Having your FP-C exam done before you even fly can work against you and for you. Some might think it shows initiative, many others will think the opposite and it will only hinder your chances of getting hired. Unless you have the experience to go with those credentials, they are pretty much meaningless and just shows you are able to pass a standardized test on any given day......... What it does not show are your critical thinking skills......

For example: The FP-C might help you land an interview, but, IF you get past the written exam and get called back for the in person clinical interview, I can guarantee when they see FP-C they will hold you to a higher standard than a paramedic who does not have those...........So, you are setting yourself up to get a much tougher scenario to work through based on that.........An example would be, I partner you with another interviewee, give you guys a scenario, make you the lead on the call, Tell you the patient is at a small outlying ER, vented, a retired Family Practice doctor has been doing his or her best until you flew in to save the day. The blood gases are in the toilet, the BP is low, HR is low, you look at the chest X-ray and see a Pneumo, do you have the doc put the chest tube in or do you do it before you take off, knowing how Boyles Law would potentially affect this pneumo.......Can you interpret the blood gases and make the appropriate vent setting changes to get the gases back in line. What meds are you going to put on the pump to support the BP and HR........How do you choose? How will those meds affect your decisions with your vent management................There are a bunch of different streets to take you down, which, given you are an FP-C, you should be competent or have a strong working knowledge.........

See where I am going with this........

So, If i were you, I wouldnt worry so much about FP-C, but, maybe try to get into a Critical Care Course, CCEMT-P or CICP, then maybe PNCCT, etc.........Then worry about the FP-C.....Work on your critical thinking skills, because, trust me, they will be obvious during the clinical scenario portion of the interview......This is where most people fail miserably...........

If you have any questions, just fire away..

JW
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John Wade MBA, CCEMT-P, FP-C, RN

"Have the courage to follow your heart and intuition, they somehow already know what you truly want to become" Steve Jobs

#3 old school

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Posted 04 October 2012 - 05:16 PM

Goose,

Take a critical care course (CCEMTP or similar), and get a job doing ground critical care. Keep doing 911 part time if you want.

After a couple years you will have learned a lot and will be far better prepared for flying than you are now. And your resume will reflect that.

I would forget FP-C for now. For the reasons John mentioned, it can potentially hinder you. On the other hand, lack of it will not hold you back if you can demonstrate the experience and knowledge that a good CCT paramedic possesses. Others will disagree, but I think FP-C presents a poor return for your investment of time at this point in your career (plus I have strong philosophical objections to it that anyone who has been on this forum for a while is tired of reading).
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bring it in for the real thing

#4 MSDeltaFlt

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Posted 07 October 2012 - 10:28 PM

Old School and John are dead accurate. The only thing I would add is for you to also get some ICU exposure if that is at all feasible wherever you live, either by working part time, as an observer, or hell even "networking" with a trusted colleague if you can get away with it. Just be sure to sign all the confidentiality forms they may have.

I say that because, depending on the "service" you apply for, you may be one hell of a street medic but if you can't wrap your brain around a critical ICU pt (believe me helicopters are flying ICU's) then you will utterly lost as John iterated and will be nothing more than an attache' with a pretty gold patch.

And network network network. It is not just how much you know and how well you know it. It is also how well you are known.
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Mike Hester, RRT/NRP/FP-C
Courage is resistance to fear, mastery of fear - not absence of fear -- Mark Twain

#5 Hellinger75

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Posted 16 October 2012 - 10:18 PM

As I said to the other guy who just posted the same question from the RN perspective. Use the search function and read all of the previous threads on these subjects.......All your questions will be answered........

Having your FP-C exam done before you even fly can work against you and for you. Some might think it shows initiative, many others will think the opposite and it will only hinder your chances of getting hired. Unless you have the experience to go with those credentials, they are pretty much meaningless and just shows you are able to pass a standardized test on any given day......... What it does not show are your critical thinking skills......

For example: The FP-C might help you land an interview, but, IF you get past the written exam and get called back for the in person clinical interview, I can guarantee when they see FP-C they will hold you to a higher standard than a paramedic who does not have those...........So, you are setting yourself up to get a much tougher scenario to work through based on that.........An example would be, I partner you with another interviewee, give you guys a scenario, make you the lead on the call, Tell you the patient is at a small outlying ER, vented, a retired Family Practice doctor has been doing his or her best until you flew in to save the day. The blood gases are in the toilet, the BP is low, HR is low, you look at the chest X-ray and see a Pneumo, do you have the doc put the chest tube in or do you do it before you take off, knowing how Boyles Law would potentially affect this pneumo.......Can you interpret the blood gases and make the appropriate vent setting changes to get the gases back in line. What meds are you going to put on the pump to support the BP and HR........How do you choose? How will those meds affect your decisions with your vent management................There are a bunch of different streets to take you down, which, given you are an FP-C, you should be competent or have a strong working knowledge.........

See where I am going with this........

So, If i were you, I wouldnt worry so much about FP-C, but, maybe try to get into a Critical Care Course, CCEMT-P or CICP, then maybe PNCCT, etc.........Then worry about the FP-C.....Work on your critical thinking skills, because, trust me, they will be obvious during the clinical scenario portion of the interview......This is where most people fail miserably...........

If you have any questions, just fire away..

JW



Just curious, how would you work on your critical thinking skills? Other than running calls...obviously.
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#6 Hellinger75

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Posted 16 October 2012 - 10:20 PM

Old School and John are dead accurate. The only thing I would add is for you to also get some ICU exposure if that is at all feasible wherever you live, either by working part time, as an observer, or hell even "networking" with a trusted colleague if you can get away with it. Just be sure to sign all the confidentiality forms they may have.

I say that because, depending on the "service" you apply for, you may be one hell of a street medic but if you can't wrap your brain around a critical ICU pt (believe me helicopters are flying ICU's) then you will utterly lost as John iterated and will be nothing more than an attache' with a pretty gold patch.

And network network network. It is not just how much you know and how well you know it. It is also how well you are known.



Do you have good experiences with observing in an ICU without being affiliated with any course? I just finished a CCP course with Creighton and did my clinicals at a local ICU. It was a good experience overall, but I get the impression they would not be cool with it if I wasn't with a school that had a clinical agreement contract (i.e. on my own).
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#7 Jwade

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Posted 17 October 2012 - 12:09 AM

Just curious, how would you work on your critical thinking skills? Other than running calls...obviously.



Take a semester or two of Critical Thinking at your local University. You would be amazed at what you learn in those courses. I had 1 semester for my bachelors, and 2 semesters during grad school. Some of the best courses and professors I have had the privilege of learning from. Not only does it help in medicine, but, I found i was using the knowledge and techniques during everyday life and especially helpful when dealing with a 5 year old boy who has a stubborn streak like his mom and dad! B)

This is a perfect example of the phrase of " You don't know what you don't know". I learned a lot i did not know and loved every minute of these classes.......Now, I only wish I could have said the same thing for my semester of graduate corporate finance.........Ugh....I still have nightmares.....LOL...


Good Luck,
JW
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John Wade MBA, CCEMT-P, FP-C, RN

"Have the courage to follow your heart and intuition, they somehow already know what you truly want to become" Steve Jobs

#8 MSDeltaFlt

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Posted 20 October 2012 - 12:32 AM

Do you have good experiences with observing in an ICU without being affiliated with any course? I just finished a CCP course with Creighton and did my clinicals at a local ICU. It was a good experience overall, but I get the impression they would not be cool with it if I wasn't with a school that had a clinical agreement contract (i.e. on my own).


I personally was lucky. I was a RRT long before I became a medic. You learn tons just by being in the environment. But even as a medic I was, and still am, part of a hospital based ALS service. If you can work for one. Hang out with them if you can. You might find some of them that really enjoy teaching, doctors too. Absorb it like a sponge.
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Mike Hester, RRT/NRP/FP-C
Courage is resistance to fear, mastery of fear - not absence of fear -- Mark Twain

#9 ActionGoose

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Posted 19 April 2013 - 12:38 AM

Well, I just got my offer. Thanks for your help everyone!
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#10 VolandoP

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Posted 12 July 2015 - 05:11 PM

I have installed the wordnet plugin in rapidminer, but didn't able to connect the text file to that operator. Can any one explain this process precisely ??
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