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Army To Civlian Flight Medic


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#41 Damen Beavers

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Posted 20 January 2013 - 11:47 PM

Sorry I have been in the books hard but I am proud to say I am now a NREMT-P! It was not as hard as I thought it would be actually. We are on leave but start our critical care phase soon and that's where we get all the skills to bring us up to civilian flight crew standards and we take the fpc! I appreciate you alls input and support. Im excited about the new possibilities all this high speed training is going to bring me and I appreciate the opportunity to be the only flight paramedic in my entire states national guard ill keep you all updated!



Maine,

So are you going to do you civilian national guard transports there in San Antonio?
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Damen Beavers RN,BSN,CEN,CFRN,LP

#42 mainemedic

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Posted 21 January 2013 - 12:04 AM

Damen, No I'm just here for training. I will be back in my state to start up a new medevac unit. I have reviewed all the posts on here and have been told by several of you that there would be people that are jealous of the training we are getting. The Army would not throw away 52 million dollars on paramedic training for nothing. We are getting all the training in a shorter time than the usual civilian flight medics. I'm am backed up by my flight surgeon a Lt colonel and our states assistant AG a general who sent me to Texas personally to be our states first flight paramedic. I will not fail. We have won't have the 3-5 years of EMS ride time you all think is so vital but I'm thinking that will soon be waived anyways for us vets.
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#43 Damen Beavers

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Posted 21 January 2013 - 12:26 AM

Damen, No I'm just here for training. I will be back in my state to start up a new medevac unit. I have reviewed all the posts on here and have been told by several of you that there would be people that are jealous of the training we are getting. The Army would not throw away 52 million dollars on paramedic training for nothing. We are getting all the training in a shorter time than the usual civilian flight medics. I'm am backed up by my flight surgeon a Lt colonel and our states assistant AG a general who sent me to Texas personally to be our states first flight paramedic. I will not fail. We have won't have the 3-5 years of EMS ride time you all think is so vital but I'm thinking that will soon be waived anyways for us vets.



Well good luck to you. Although you still seem to misunderstand. None of us on here are "jealous of the training you are getting". There isn't any training you could receive that equals street/hospital experience. We are only concerned that your over confidence is going to get someone hurt or killed. We all love to see people accomplish their dreams of HEMS and everyone is only trying to put you on the right track. Also keep in mind that you may be sitting next to one of us in your career or your up-coming clinical rotations. HEMS is a very small world and I would caution you to humble yourself. I have thrown away many applications of flight medics and nurses with all of the experience and certifications for attitude alone.

I would also caution you that this is a public forum and your "local flight service" and your Army Flight Paramedic Program have a close working relationship. You have a great opportunity, but you need to humble yourself. You will get much further in this industry.
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Damen Beavers RN,BSN,CEN,CFRN,LP

#44 ForeverLearning

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Posted 21 January 2013 - 01:55 AM

Damen, No I'm just here for training. I will be back in my state to start up a new medevac unit. I have reviewed all the posts on here and have been told by several of you that there would be people that are jealous of the training we are getting. The Army would not throw away 52 million dollars on paramedic training for nothing. We are getting all the training in a shorter time than the usual civilian flight medics. I'm am backed up by my flight surgeon a Lt colonel and our states assistant AG a general who sent me to Texas personally to be our states first flight paramedic. I will not fail. We have won't have the 3-5 years of EMS ride time you all think is so vital but I'm thinking that will soon be waived anyways for us vets.


I must admit this thread was very amusing. Especially the superior training.

I recon that "52 million dollar paramedic training" feeling will quickly overwhelm your BDU's on sight of such basic IFT transfer

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#45 Jwade

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Posted 21 January 2013 - 02:13 AM

Damen, No I'm just here for training. I will be back in my state to start up a new medevac unit. I have reviewed all the posts on here and have been told by several of you that there would be people that are jealous of the training we are getting. The Army would not throw away 52 million dollars on paramedic training for nothing. We are getting all the training in a shorter time than the usual civilian flight medics. I'm am backed up by my flight surgeon a Lt colonel and our states assistant AG a general who sent me to Texas personally to be our states first flight paramedic. I will not fail. We have won't have the 3-5 years of EMS ride time you all think is so vital but I'm thinking that will soon be waived anyways for us vets.



Maine,

You can be backed up by anybody you want in the military, however, they are NOT civilians and do not work in the civilian field.

I tell you what, I will make you a wager right here and now, I will bet you one of my paychecks against one of yours, that you will NOT get hired by a civilian flight program when you are finished with your training, until you meet the requisite experience level. There is no reputable rotor program in the United States that would hire a brand new paramedic, no matter how much your training costs. The 3-5 years experience will NEVER be waived. There is a certain thing called Legal Liability, no program is going to increase their liability by hiring brand new paramedics.....A trial lawyer would have a field day with that one.

FYI, Just for your information, there is no training you are getting, which civilian flight crews do not get on a daily basis. I guarantee you the ARMY is not flying balloon pump patients, LVAD's, ECMO, NEO's, on their Blackhawks.....

So, Let me know if you accept my wager. I will gladly give you my contact information.

JW
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John Wade MBA, CCEMT-P, FP-C, RN

"Have the courage to follow your heart and intuition, they somehow already know what you truly want to become" Steve Jobs

#46 old school

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Posted 21 January 2013 - 02:29 AM

The Army would not throw away 52 million dollars on paramedic training for nothing.


This was my favorite part.

Anyone who thinks that the US Army doesn't regularly "throw away" millions of dollars.....knows nothing about the US Army.


As for the rest of it, I'll just say this:
Civilian flight paramedics are experts in prehospital care. Expertise comes primarily from experience. There is NO shortcut around that.
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bring it in for the real thing

#47 Gila

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Posted 21 January 2013 - 02:35 AM

Unfortunately, you do not know what you do not know brother. Trust me when I say that people here and not jealous of your training. Many of the people here have spent several years in the field, have higher degrees and have been through robust educational and training programmes. Additionally, several of us have multidisciplinary education. It is not uncommon to see paramedics with nursing degrees and critical care nursing experience or people with respiratory therapy experience. I can only hope you will be able to develop some perspective and perhaps a bit of humility going foreword. It is a humbling experience when you are faced with a critically ill patient and you are making decisions based on advanced diagnostics and interfacing with equipment and devices that have to potential to kill a patient. I sincerely hope when you are faced with an overwhelming situation, you will have the humility and maturity to acknowledge the gravity of what is going on and you can keep your ego from hurting or killing somebody. I absolutely wish you the best as you go foreword however. I was once a relatively inexperienced ER nurse of a few years and somebody took a chance on me. That chance led to several years of incredible experience, enlightenment and humility. While I no longer fly, the lessons I learned over those years have never gone away and I am thankful to have that critical care experience every time I take a new batch of paramedic students into the ICU.
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Christopher Bare
"Non fui, fui, non sum, non curo "

#48 TexRNmedic

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Posted 21 January 2013 - 02:44 AM

Yup! I'm in the second class. How are my fellow warrior paramedics doing?


Really great group of folks. I've enjoyed hearing about the content covered in the course and the kind of mission profile they will be doing "over there." Their path to paramedic certification is interesting. They are also getting to see a wide array of sick medical and trauma patients from all age populations. Lots of invasive skills to. I look forward to having more of you guys in the future. Might I recommend Wingfield's ACE-SAT text as a self-assessment tool of your content mastery for civilian HEMS. This might help you on your desire to bridge the differences between combat flight MEDIC and civilian flight PARAMEDIC as well as ready you for the FP-C exam. I know some pretty sharp and very experienced street paramedics who had to work very diligently to succeed on the exam. Please remember so much of this job is based on developing a significant foundation of experience, repertoire of mastered skills, critical thinking and clinical intuition.

Funny picture Learning. Very recently had a patient or two that looked worse than that. Always love walking in to 12 infusions.
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Wes Seale
Houston , TX

#49 scottyb

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Posted 21 January 2013 - 03:42 PM

Maine maybe you should sit this one out....just stop talkin' for awhile.
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Scott Bild RN, FP-C

#50 SerendepitySaki

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Posted 21 January 2013 - 06:00 PM

I have deliberately refrained from public commentary. Maine, if you are indeed returning to Maine, I would resepctfully suggest that you contact me off-line.
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LET THE WILD RUMPUS BEGIN !!!!!!
Sean G. Smith, RN-Alphabet Soup

#51 mainemedic

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Posted 21 January 2013 - 09:49 PM

I'm actually going to be in the south east. I'm tired of freezing cold winters and moved after my last deployment. Scotty B , I never surrender. Even if I never get a job in civilian life flight My unit will take care of me with a job in our flight clinic and I can keep my skills sharp doing part time ambo in the county I'm also a VFF. I also got promoted while here and the pressure is on me to be the absolute best. No one else from my state is a flight paramedic. I acknowledge I need to appear less egotistical and watch how I say things to you all. Thanks for the correction. Ringing the reapers doorbell one patient at a time
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#52 scottyb

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Posted 22 January 2013 - 02:32 AM

I'm actually going to be in the south east. I'm tired of freezing cold winters and moved after my last deployment. Scotty B , I never surrender. Even if I never get a job in civilian life flight My unit will take care of me with a job in our flight clinic and I can keep my skills sharp doing part time ambo in the county I'm also a VFF. I also got promoted while here and the pressure is on me to be the absolute best. No one else from my state is a flight paramedic. I acknowledge I need to appear less egotistical and watch how I say things to you all. Thanks for the correction. Ringing the reapers doorbell one patient at a time

That's the most intelligent thing you have said since you have been on this forum. Wise decision. You have no idea what you are getting into, and there are no shortcuts. You are merely scratching the surface. You remind me of the SOB paramedic students who show up at my fire station and think they already know it all and cannot be trained. Ever heard of the "entitlement generation" Maine?

I have been flying patients for over ten years now, and there will always be calls that challenge me or could have been done better. I am forever learning, and that is why I love medicine; it is always evolving, and I want to learn/evolve with it. If you have any twinkle of common sense in that arrogant Army trained brain of yours you WILL heed the many messages being presented to you, otherwise you WILL kill someone. Respect the people trying to train you and give them your undivided attention. Shut up, listen and learn.
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Scott Bild RN, FP-C

#53 mainemedic

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Posted 28 January 2013 - 07:13 PM

Started Critical care phase today! Two more months and an FP-C exam! Scottyb, you might have appreciated my "army trained brain a little more if you were a wounded warrior in the back of my Blackhawk (2008). As I have said no one died on me! I'm looking forward to supplementing existing experience with what the next two months will bring us. Thank you all for your support.
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#54 scottyb

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Posted 29 January 2013 - 02:53 AM

Started Critical care phase today! Two more months and an FP-C exam! Scottyb, you might have appreciated my "army trained brain a little more if you were a wounded warrior in the back of my Blackhawk (2008). As I have said no one died on me! I'm looking forward to supplementing existing experience with what the next two months will bring us. Thank you all for your support.

I....oh what the hell's the use. Where's my beer.
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Scott Bild RN, FP-C

#55 BrianACNP

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Posted 29 January 2013 - 03:42 AM

Started Critical care phase today! Two more months and an FP-C exam! Scottyb, you might have appreciated my "army trained brain a little more if you were a wounded warrior in the back of my Blackhawk (2008). As I have said no one died on me! I'm looking forward to supplementing existing experience with what the next two months will bring us. Thank you all for your support.


No one has died on you if in fact they are pronounced dead at the receiving facility! :D



Brian
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Brian, MSN, ACNP, CCRN

#56 mainemedic

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Posted 30 January 2013 - 11:13 PM

Funny Brian! This phase of the course is going to be intense! We have been issued the JB critical care transport book along with a ton of other stuff. Can anyone give feedback on the JB CCT book? Scottyb, I'll buy the beer when I pass FP-C in two months!
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#57 ForeverLearning

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Posted 31 January 2013 - 07:39 AM

Funny Brian! This phase of the course is going to be intense! We have been issued the JB critical care transport book along with a ton of other stuff. Can anyone give feedback on the JB CCT book? Scottyb, I'll buy the beer when I pass FP-C in two months!


Books? You asking about books? You have a solid 52 million dollar army training behind your back no need to wait 2 months for the exam I think you should take it now.


You need to keep the trolling subtle, it's getting too obvious.
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#58 Macgyver

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Posted 02 February 2013 - 04:03 AM

X2
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Ken BHSc, RN, REMT-P

#59 insen...

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Posted 05 February 2013 - 11:26 AM

I lol'd about the idea of a magic formula where an abbreviated amount of military experience = some vast amount of civilian experience.

If that's the case, then all my combat training should've given me around a two year head start on getting my black belt in karate. B) Maybe all that time I spent in the water will shave a few hours off a PADI class, too.

Just a little comment about the 'military-gonna-due-civilian-medevac' idea. One dark and stormy night I got a call from a 'guy' who was looking for flight paramedics for a "new program" somewhere west of the Mississippi. Turns out he was an O-3 pilot, and this was a military operation that had some helicopters that lacked any purpose, and they were going to onboard some flight medics back into uniform and start offering medevac services to the naive citizens of their fine state...it was an effort to avoid sequestration and preserve whatever country-club gig they had going on.

I didn't need another DD214, so I declined. Plus I figured this act of desperation was going to be run about as efficiently as a last-minute TDY, and I wanted no part of it. I later learned that there was some adventure in Afghanistan that saved their jobs. Given the current lack of love that this admin has for the military, I wouldn't be surprised if this is a repeat performance.

I just wanna throw this one out there; anyone who talks about military medicine and hasn't been in the military...FOS. It's mostly irrelevant to your particular, ummmmm, goals, but I just wanted to get that off my chest.

Now I'm going to level with you about the stuff you won't read about on job applications, career guides, or the BLS occupational outlook summaries for flight paramedics; many flight programs aren't going to give a flippidy doodah about your military experience. Some may even consider it a liability. The elephant in the room is that the nation is saturated with flight programs, and anyone who is able to squeeze into one of the flight suits that look like NASCAR pit crew and ride around in low-budget 30-year old single engine helicopters that shouldn't even be carrying a stretcher is going to find a job as a flight medic somewhere. Option #2 is the political route...that works well for many. Point is, don't be discouraged. Assembling a few functional elements of being a reasonably good paramedic is going to put you well on the path to getting that life-affirming paramedic job.

Good luck.
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"Miserere stultus qui dicit latin." Contemporary French Linguist Insenescence

#60 mainemedic

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Posted 08 February 2013 - 02:21 AM

Insen, Thanks for posting in with the advice. I am capable of being political and have backing from my flight surgeon and a two star general. As for now this critical care course is a smoker! But tomorrow I get to do a ride along with the flight program here and it's going to be awesome to get back in the air!
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