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Dispatching Rotary Resources


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#1 randyl

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Posted 10 August 2012 - 08:56 PM

Greetings

I searched the forum first to ensure this hasn't already been addressed. We are currently reviewing how we dispatch our rotary wing aircraft. At present, the pilots are paged and respond back by landline or cell phone, provided the information and then either accept immediately (they are familiar with the area weather etc) or they do a weather check and then call the center back accepting or turning down the flight.

We are looking to alpha numeric pagers or smart phones where the information could be sent electronically but this will still require a phone confirmation of rcving the information. I would be interested to hear how other programs are sending the flight information to their rotary pilots. Thanks in advance.

Randy
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#2 randyl

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Posted 17 August 2012 - 03:27 AM

Any one?
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#3 Wally

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Posted 21 August 2012 - 02:52 PM

The program I work has a program area wide common radio system linked to dispatch/flight following. Every on-duty crew member has an active handset with them at all times, except for a defined rest period.
A dispatch request is "toned" with a base specific tones followed by dispatch making a verbal statement of request "Hero flight 13, standby/respond Scuffle Grit GA (scene)" or "Hard Scrabble Hospital, Scuffle Grit to Miracle Medical Center in Metropolis" for an intrafacility. Hero 13 pilot rogers the request or states "checking weather", or the med crew hunts him/her down and heckles pitilessly until consciousness returns. Our handsets are notoriously fallible, one will work while one sitting right next to it is silent... Medical crew still assume I'm asleep or just slack, but hey! they're not aviators, so ignore them as usual.
During specific periods, we are allowed to "go to the phones" by stating a request for phone dispatch, at which time dispatch will call the pilot phone directly with a request. A request during rest period cascades from friendly tones in each sleep room to hollering in the common area to an airhorn and banging on the door (never had to go that far more than once).
I find that a shared program radio freq enhances situational awareness, if a base declines a request that I'm near, I start planning and checking weather before the request. The system is also our flight following channel, so program personnel can monitor a flight in progress.
We've tried pagers, but the present system is positive with built-in backup. We've also tried alerting specific handsets, but found a lack of immediate feedback discouraging- did the alert go where intended? if not, why not? etc.
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#4 randyl

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Posted 26 August 2012 - 05:57 PM

The program I work has a program area wide common radio system linked to dispatch/flight following. Every on-duty crew member has an active handset with them at all times, except for a defined rest period.
A dispatch request is "toned" with a base specific tones followed by dispatch making a verbal statement of request "Hero flight 13, standby/respond Scuffle Grit GA (scene)" or "Hard Scrabble Hospital, Scuffle Grit to Miracle Medical Center in Metropolis" for an intrafacility. Hero 13 pilot rogers the request or states "checking weather", or the med crew hunts him/her down and heckles pitilessly until consciousness returns. Our handsets are notoriously fallible, one will work while one sitting right next to it is silent... Medical crew still assume I'm asleep or just slack, but hey! they're not aviators, so ignore them as usual.
During specific periods, we are allowed to "go to the phones" by stating a request for phone dispatch, at which time dispatch will call the pilot phone directly with a request. A request during rest period cascades from friendly tones in each sleep room to hollering in the common area to an airhorn and banging on the door (never had to go that far more than once).
I find that a shared program radio freq enhances situational awareness, if a base declines a request that I'm near, I start planning and checking weather before the request. The system is also our flight following channel, so program personnel can monitor a flight in progress.
We've tried pagers, but the present system is positive with built-in backup. We've also tried alerting specific handsets, but found a lack of immediate feedback discouraging- did the alert go where intended? if not, why not? etc.


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#5 randyl

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Posted 26 August 2012 - 05:58 PM

Wally
Thanks for the reply.
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#6 ztenec

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Posted 10 September 2012 - 06:36 PM

Our communications center does a group page on alpha-numeric pagers to crew and pilot for request to location. Pilot calls center after checking weather and completing risk assessment saying go/no go. Group (including management) is then paged Go/No Go to location for whatever reason. It's a hospital based service so the crew can be in several different places when the request goes out.
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#7 randyl

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Posted 11 September 2012 - 08:13 PM

Thanks very much.
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#8 vtach1010

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Posted 07 October 2012 - 02:29 AM

We are toned out over the radio with basic information. Scene - General location of call and perhaps heading and distance. We get the rest once we lift off such as lat/long, ground contact and anything else. IFT - Pick up and drop off hospitals along with pt wt. They will text us the rest of the information as we get moving such as Dx, intubated, drips ect.
Because there can be radio failures like listed above if we do not answer back on the radio within 2 minutes dispatch will call on a land line or crew cell phones
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#9 randyl

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Posted 31 October 2012 - 06:43 PM

We are toned out over the radio with basic information. Scene - General location of call and perhaps heading and distance. We get the rest once we lift off such as lat/long, ground contact and anything else. IFT - Pick up and drop off hospitals along with pt wt. They will text us the rest of the information as we get moving such as Dx, intubated, drips ect.
Because there can be radio failures like listed above if we do not answer back on the radio within 2 minutes dispatch will call on a land line or crew cell phones

Thanks for the feedback
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