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Medical Crew/pilot O2 Requirements Per Faa


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#1 onearmwonder

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Posted 03 August 2012 - 08:59 PM

Does anyone know what the FAA requirements are or where I can find them for crews and pilots in regards to having to use O2 at certain altitudes?

Matt
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#2 Jwade

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Posted 03 August 2012 - 10:11 PM

Does anyone know what the FAA requirements are or where I can find them for crews and pilots in regards to having to use O2 at certain altitudes?

Matt




You want to read FAR 135.89 Pilot Requirements : Use of Oxygen.

Sec. 135.89 — Pilot requirements: Use of oxygen.

(a) Unpressurized aircraft. Each pilot of an unpressurized aircraft shall use oxygen continuously when flying—
(1) At altitudes above 10,000 feet through 12,000 feet MSL for that part of the flight at those altitudes that is of more than 30 minutes duration; and

(2) Above 12,000 feet MSL.

(B) Pressurized aircraft. (1) Whenever a pressurized aircraft is operated with the cabin pressure altitude more than 10,000 feet MSL, each pilot shall comply with paragraph (a) of this section.

(2) Whenever a pressurized aircraft is operated at altitudes above 25,000 feet through 35,000 feet MSL, unless each pilot has an approved quick-donning type oxygen mask—

(i) At least one pilot at the controls shall wear, secured and sealed, an oxygen mask that either supplies oxygen at all times or automatically supplies oxygen whenever the cabin pressure altitude exceeds 12,000 feet MSL; and

(ii) During that flight, each other pilot on flight deck duty shall have an oxygen mask, connected to an oxygen supply, located so as to allow immediate placing of the mask on the pilot's face sealed and secured for use.

(3) Whenever a pressurized aircraft is operated at altitudes above 35,000 feet MSL, at least one pilot at the controls shall wear, secured and sealed, an oxygen mask required by paragraph (B)(2)(i) of this section.

(4) If one pilot leaves a pilot duty station of an aircraft when operating at altitudes above 25,000 feet MSL, the remaining pilot at the controls shall put on and use an approved oxygen mask until the other pilot returns to the pilot duty station of the aircraft.


Sec. 91.211 — Supplemental oxygen.

(a) General. No person may operate a civil aircraft of U.S. registry—
(1) At cabin pressure altitudes above 12,500 feet (MSL) up to and including 14,000 feet (MSL) unless the required minimum flight crew is provided with and uses supplemental oxygen for that part of the flight at those altitudes that is of more than 30 minutes duration;

(2) At cabin pressure altitudes above 14,000 feet (MSL) unless the required minimum flight crew is provided with and uses supplemental oxygen during the entire flight time at those altitudes; and

(3) At cabin pressure altitudes above 15,000 feet (MSL) unless each occupant of the aircraft is provided with supplemental oxygen.

(B) Pressurized cabin aircraft. (1) No person may operate a civil aircraft of U.S. registry with a pressurized cabin—

(i) At flight altitudes above flight level 250 unless at least a 10-minute supply of supplemental oxygen, in addition to any oxygen required to satisfy paragraph (a) of this section, is available for each occupant of the aircraft for use in the event that a descent is necessitated by loss of cabin pressurization; and

(ii) At flight altitudes above flight level 350 unless one pilot at the controls of the airplane is wearing and using an oxygen mask that is secured and sealed and that either supplies oxygen at all times or automatically supplies oxygen whenever the cabin pressure altitude of the airplane exceeds 14,000 feet (MSL), except that the one pilot need not wear and use an oxygen mask while at or below flight level 410 if there are two pilots at the controls and each pilot has a quick-donning type of oxygen mask that can be placed on the face with one hand from the ready position within 5 seconds, supplying oxygen and properly secured and sealed.

(2) Notwithstanding paragraph (B)(1)(ii) of this section, if for any reason at any time it is necessary for one pilot to leave the controls of the aircraft when operating at flight altitudes above flight level 350, the remaining pilot at the controls shall put on and use an oxygen mask until the other pilot has returned to that crewmember's station.


In my experience flying airplanes, you start to feel the effects at 12500, pretty quickly, I had a small pulse ox with me a few times, and I was in the low 90's at 12,500 flying over top of the Grand Canyon. Once i cleared the terrain north of Bryce Canyon airport, I dropped back down to 10,500 and was right back up to high 90's.....

Hope this helps! The FAA does NOT recognize medical crew specifically, so we get lumped in with the passengers. Hopefully Serendepitysaki will approve! ;)


JW
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John Wade MBA, CCEMT-P, FP-C, RN

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#3 SerendepitySaki

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Posted 03 August 2012 - 10:28 PM

funny you should mention that... i was JUST lecturing a flight team last week on the relevance of Dalton's law to "shunt physiology" for a C-NPT Review course... :P
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#4 onearmwonder

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Posted 04 August 2012 - 04:03 PM

You want to read FAR 135.89 Pilot Requirements : Use of Oxygen.

Sec. 135.89 — Pilot requirements: Use of oxygen.

(a) Unpressurized aircraft. Each pilot of an unpressurized aircraft shall use oxygen continuously when flying—
(1) At altitudes above 10,000 feet through 12,000 feet MSL for that part of the flight at those altitudes that is of more than 30 minutes duration; and

(2) Above 12,000 feet MSL.

(B) Pressurized aircraft. (1) Whenever a pressurized aircraft is operated with the cabin pressure altitude more than 10,000 feet MSL, each pilot shall comply with paragraph (a) of this section.

(2) Whenever a pressurized aircraft is operated at altitudes above 25,000 feet through 35,000 feet MSL, unless each pilot has an approved quick-donning type oxygen mask—

(i) At least one pilot at the controls shall wear, secured and sealed, an oxygen mask that either supplies oxygen at all times or automatically supplies oxygen whenever the cabin pressure altitude exceeds 12,000 feet MSL; and

(ii) During that flight, each other pilot on flight deck duty shall have an oxygen mask, connected to an oxygen supply, located so as to allow immediate placing of the mask on the pilot's face sealed and secured for use.

(3) Whenever a pressurized aircraft is operated at altitudes above 35,000 feet MSL, at least one pilot at the controls shall wear, secured and sealed, an oxygen mask required by paragraph (B)(2)(i) of this section.

(4) If one pilot leaves a pilot duty station of an aircraft when operating at altitudes above 25,000 feet MSL, the remaining pilot at the controls shall put on and use an approved oxygen mask until the other pilot returns to the pilot duty station of the aircraft.


Sec. 91.211 — Supplemental oxygen.

(a) General. No person may operate a civil aircraft of U.S. registry—
(1) At cabin pressure altitudes above 12,500 feet (MSL) up to and including 14,000 feet (MSL) unless the required minimum flight crew is provided with and uses supplemental oxygen for that part of the flight at those altitudes that is of more than 30 minutes duration;

(2) At cabin pressure altitudes above 14,000 feet (MSL) unless the required minimum flight crew is provided with and uses supplemental oxygen during the entire flight time at those altitudes; and

(3) At cabin pressure altitudes above 15,000 feet (MSL) unless each occupant of the aircraft is provided with supplemental oxygen.

(B) Pressurized cabin aircraft. (1) No person may operate a civil aircraft of U.S. registry with a pressurized cabin—

(i) At flight altitudes above flight level 250 unless at least a 10-minute supply of supplemental oxygen, in addition to any oxygen required to satisfy paragraph (a) of this section, is available for each occupant of the aircraft for use in the event that a descent is necessitated by loss of cabin pressurization; and

(ii) At flight altitudes above flight level 350 unless one pilot at the controls of the airplane is wearing and using an oxygen mask that is secured and sealed and that either supplies oxygen at all times or automatically supplies oxygen whenever the cabin pressure altitude of the airplane exceeds 14,000 feet (MSL), except that the one pilot need not wear and use an oxygen mask while at or below flight level 410 if there are two pilots at the controls and each pilot has a quick-donning type of oxygen mask that can be placed on the face with one hand from the ready position within 5 seconds, supplying oxygen and properly secured and sealed.

(2) Notwithstanding paragraph (B)(1)(ii) of this section, if for any reason at any time it is necessary for one pilot to leave the controls of the aircraft when operating at flight altitudes above flight level 350, the remaining pilot at the controls shall put on and use an oxygen mask until the other pilot has returned to that crewmember's station.


In my experience flying airplanes, you start to feel the effects at 12500, pretty quickly, I had a small pulse ox with me a few times, and I was in the low 90's at 12,500 flying over top of the Grand Canyon. Once i cleared the terrain north of Bryce Canyon airport, I dropped back down to 10,500 and was right back up to high 90's.....

Hope this helps! The FAA does NOT recognize medical crew specifically, so we get lumped in with the passengers. Hopefully Serendepitysaki will approve! ;)


JW


Thanks John this does help... Is it any different at night with unpressurized cabins and with NVGs since our night vision is disturbed starting roughly around 5,000MSL?

Matt
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#5 Jwade

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Posted 04 August 2012 - 04:37 PM

Thanks John this does help... Is it any different at night with unpressurized cabins and with NVGs since our night vision is disturbed starting roughly around 5,000MSL?

Matt



NO, The time of day makes absolutely no difference.

Some people just do not do well with NVG's (Yes, even pilots) since it limits the FOV so narrowly........It can create a sense of phobia and if you throw in some mild hypoxia symptoms at altitude, then, you have the potential for things to progressively get worse.......

5000 ft above sea level should generally not be that big of a deal unless the person is not accustomed to being at this altitude..........Once your body acclimates to the altitude, everything should be fine, including vision. Just think about those guys who climb EVEREST every year with no oxygen, they ALWAYS start their summit bids in the dead of night.........You would not want your vision to suck up there when you're walking on an ice ledge with 5000ft drops on either side of you......

JW
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John Wade MBA, CCEMT-P, FP-C, RN

"Have the courage to follow your heart and intuition, they somehow already know what you truly want to become" Steve Jobs