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#1 Matt_USN

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Posted 18 December 2011 - 03:53 AM

Hello, FlightWeb! I'm a Corpsman in the U.S. Navy, currently going through the Respiratory Therapy program. I will graduate with my AS and my CRT, and will immediately test RRT as soon as I get to my next command. Once I graduate, I'll have just under four years left in my enlistment contract. I'll spend that time wherever the Navy needs me - hopefully in a large hospital so I can get involved in ICU care. During my time in the Navy, I have to get my ACLS, and I want to get my NICU RRT as well (I'm drawn to neonatal care for some reason...I find it fascinating. Just did an article review for class on ventilation techniques on neonatal patients with respiratory disorders, and I must have read the article a dozen times!). I'll also be using the tuition assistance program to begin my degree in Nursing. Once I'm out, I'll use my GI Bill for whatever I have left to finish my degree, if anything is left.

While in the Navy, I'll be getting a 2nd job in the civilian world. That will give me exposure to the civilian way of doing things, and add to my collective experience.

Long term - I have mixed feelings. I do not know if I want to pursue a career in HEMS as a Flight Respiratory Therapist or a Flight Nurse. To be honest, I know practically nothing about Flight RT positions, so some research is needed there. Just thinking about it, it seems Flight RT will lean more towards fixed-wing than helo operations, and I want helo. Why helicopter? I am a passionate aviation enthusiast (especially when it concerns helicopters), and if my color vision was perfect, I'd be torn between flying the darn thing or sitting in the back. I've flown with a HEMS before, and will hopefully be doing a ride along with the local operation near base in January. I've received good advice in the past, but that was a while ago when I was younger and didn't quite ask the right question. This time around I will be better prepared.

I am ready for a long - and enjoyable - road to get to a flying position. I'm not in any rush, and figure it will be a good ten years possibly until I am competitive. My RT experience will not be the right mix to get hired on somewhere once I get my RN - I fully expect to do at least another five years in an active hospital ICU/ER as a RN first. With that being said, I'll be here for a long time poking my head in every now and then reading up and staying "current" with the community. For those of you who fly, thank you for the services you provide to your community and taking the time here to help others achieve their dreams and expand their knowledge.
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#2 BrianACNP

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Posted 18 December 2011 - 10:59 AM

Hello, FlightWeb! I'm a Corpsman in the U.S. Navy, currently going through the Respiratory Therapy program. I will graduate with my AS and my CRT, and will immediately test RRT as soon as I get to my next command. Once I graduate, I'll have just under four years left in my enlistment contract. I'll spend that time wherever the Navy needs me - hopefully in a large hospital so I can get involved in ICU care. During my time in the Navy, I have to get my ACLS, and I want to get my NICU RRT as well (I'm drawn to neonatal care for some reason...I find it fascinating. Just did an article review for class on ventilation techniques on neonatal patients with respiratory disorders, and I must have read the article a dozen times!). I'll also be using the tuition assistance program to begin my degree in Nursing. Once I'm out, I'll use my GI Bill for whatever I have left to finish my degree, if anything is left.

While in the Navy, I'll be getting a 2nd job in the civilian world. That will give me exposure to the civilian way of doing things, and add to my collective experience.

Long term - I have mixed feelings. I do not know if I want to pursue a career in HEMS as a Flight Respiratory Therapist or a Flight Nurse. To be honest, I know practically nothing about Flight RT positions, so some research is needed there. Just thinking about it, it seems Flight RT will lean more towards fixed-wing than helo operations, and I want helo. Why helicopter? I am a passionate aviation enthusiast (especially when it concerns helicopters), and if my color vision was perfect, I'd be torn between flying the darn thing or sitting in the back. I've flown with a HEMS before, and will hopefully be doing a ride along with the local operation near base in January. I've received good advice in the past, but that was a while ago when I was younger and didn't quite ask the right question. This time around I will be better prepared.

I am ready for a long - and enjoyable - road to get to a flying position. I'm not in any rush, and figure it will be a good ten years possibly until I am competitive. My RT experience will not be the right mix to get hired on somewhere once I get my RN - I fully expect to do at least another five years in an active hospital ICU/ER as a RN first. With that being said, I'll be here for a long time poking my head in every now and then reading up and staying "current" with the community. For those of you who fly, thank you for the services you provide to your community and taking the time here to help others achieve their dreams and expand their knowledge.


Check out MedCenter Air in Charlotte, NC. This program utilizes respiratory therapists on all modes of transports (FW, RW, Ground) for all types of transports (scenes, interfacilities). I know there are other programs and some on here will identify them for you.....this is one to look at as you research the role.

Brian
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#3 Matt_USN

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Posted 18 December 2011 - 02:36 PM

Check out MedCenter Air in Charlotte, NC. This program utilizes respiratory therapists on all modes of transports (FW, RW, Ground) for all types of transports (scenes, interfacilities). I know there are other programs and some on here will identify them for you.....this is one to look at as you research the role.

Brian


Thank you for the tip, Brian.
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#4 flightrrt

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Posted 27 January 2012 - 03:20 PM

Some other programs that you might also want to consider:

Lifestar, Hartford, CT
Northwest MedStar, Spokane, WA
StarCare, Lincoln, NE

All of these programs utilize an RT on all mission types.
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Aaron J. Lund, JD, LL.M., CHC, CHPC, CHRC, RRT-NPS
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#5 RT_TLP

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Posted 28 January 2012 - 01:45 PM

A nursing degree will open more doors than a degree in respiratory.


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#6 FloridaMedic

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Posted 28 January 2012 - 04:21 PM

NICU teams will use whatever mode of transportation it takes to get the job done. We'll go by fixed wing for long distances and helicopter for shorter distances. Ground for nearby and longer distances where weather will not allow for flight.

For either RN or RRT, go for a Bachelors degree. If you have your AS as an RT, go for a BSN if you believe that is the route you will take. The better teams take their education very seriously since you may be doing research, ECMO and a variety of advanced procedures.

Arkansas Childrens has an awesome team.
http://www.archildre...-Transport.aspx

Florida Hospital in Orlando has a dedicated helicopter staffed by RNs/RRTs for adult transfers and a NICU team.
http://www.floridaho...aFlightOne.aspx

CHOC in California
http://www.choc.org/...x.cfm?id=P00205

Interesting blog about CHOC's team.
http://blogs.ocfamil...bulance-chaser/

Atlanta Childrens
http://www.choa.org/...nsport-Services

Texas Children's Kangaroo Crew
http://www.texaschil...oCrew/Team.aspx

There are so many great teams out there which are RN/RRT which is the most common NICU team configuration.



You also should join the AARC's Transport Section to meet all of the RRTs who are currently involved in transport.
http://connect.aarc.org/Home/
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#7 FloridaMedic

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Posted 28 January 2012 - 04:28 PM

A nursing degree will open more doors than a degree in respiratory.


You sound already defeated as an RT with that statement.

As a Respiratory Therapist doors can open with the right education, the right effort and the right attitude.

Respiratory Therapy is a speciality. You should have known that before entering it. If you wanted more choices for other specialties in case you discovered you didn't like the respiratory stuff then nursing would have be a better choice. You can however take the specialty of Respiratory Therapy to many levels.

I again suggest you get on the AARC website and see what RRTs are doing today in their profession.
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#8 RT_TLP

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Posted 28 January 2012 - 05:04 PM

.


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"We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence, therefore, is not an act but a habit" - Aristotle
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#9 old school

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Posted 28 January 2012 - 09:50 PM

A nursing degree will open more doors than a degree in respiratory.




You sound already defeated as an RT with that statement.

As a Respiratory Therapist doors can open with the right education, the right effort and the right attitude.

Respiratory Therapy is a speciality. You should have known that before entering it. If you wanted more choices for other specialties in case you discovered you didn't like the respiratory stuff then nursing would have be a better choice. You can however take the specialty of Respiratory Therapy to many levels.

I again suggest you get on the AARC website and see what RRTs are doing today in their profession.


Just curious what it was about Tom's post that lead you to think that he didn't know "respiratory therapy was a specialty" before entering, or that he "didn't like respiratory stuff"?

His post is factually, objectively correct, and I see nothing in his brief statement that implies what you took from it.
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#10 FloridaMedic

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Posted 29 January 2012 - 02:38 AM

Just curious what it was about Tom's post that lead you to think that he didn't know "respiratory therapy was a specialty" before entering, or that he "didn't like respiratory stuff"?

His post is factually, objectively correct, and I see nothing in his brief statement that implies what you took from it.


It comes from a combination of all of his posts along with the fact that he has not posted any of these questions on the AARC forum even after several invitations. If you want to learn more about your profession, you seek advice from those who are the educators, managers and "rock stars" of your profession profession rather than a forum with only a few very opinionated individuals who are experts only by their own saying. This forum is dominated by Paramedics, a few nurses and very, very few RTs. The nursing comment he made might be true but lacks vision for his own profession which I would expect a new grad to be more enthusiastic about being an RT. If you are now seeing yourself as just a shadow under nursing instead of understanding how much there is to the specialty of Respiratory Therapy, you will fall into the same trap Paramedics have for over 40 years. You will be seeing the limitations rather than opportunities and comparing the differences for what you can not do rather than what you can do.
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#11 Jwade

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Posted 29 January 2012 - 02:53 AM

It comes from a combination of all of his posts along with the fact that he has not posted any of these questions on the AARC forum even after several invitations. If you want to learn more about your profession, you seek advice from those who are the educators, managers and "rock stars" of your profession profession rather than a forum with only a few very opinionated individuals who are experts only by their own saying. This forum is dominated by Paramedics, a few nurses and very, very few RTs. The nursing comment he made might be true but lacks vision for his own profession which I would expect a new grad to be more enthusiastic about being an RT. If you are now seeing yourself as just a shadow under nursing instead of understanding how much there is to the specialty of Respiratory Therapy, you will fall into the same trap Paramedics have for over 40 years. You will be seeing the limitations rather than opportunities and comparing the differences for what you can not do rather than what you can do.



Seriously???? Please enlighten the forum as to how this highly subjective accolade is bestowed upon an individual RT? Can you provide the criteria the AARC has established for this honor? The last time I checked, the Nursing and Paramedic profession did not have any criteria for such an accolade.

Thanks!
JW
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#12 RT_TLP

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Posted 29 January 2012 - 08:43 AM

Let's recap. The OP is in the navy and looking long term, wants to get involved with critical care transport - especially helicopters. Between the RN and RRT degree AND a flight position, there are MORE DOORS OPEN FOR RN'S THAN RRT'S!!!!!!

Let's try to stay on topic for the OP.

FloridaMedic, if you would like to slander me and my thoughts, simply send me a PM. In the meantime, have a great day.
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"We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence, therefore, is not an act but a habit" - Aristotle
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#13 FloridaMedic

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Posted 29 January 2012 - 02:09 PM

Let's recap. The OP is in the navy and looking long term, wants to get involved with critical care transport - especially helicopters. Between the RN and RRT degree AND a flight position, there are MORE DOORS OPEN FOR RN'S THAN RRT'S!!!!!!

Let's try to stay on topic for the OP.

FloridaMedic, if you would like to slander me and my thoughts, simply send me a PM. In the meantime, have a great day.



RT_TLP

Critical Care Specialty transport is where the Respiratory Therapists show what they are all about.

The OP is also interested in NICU and there are many opportunites in transport for RRTs along with a very large scope of practice including ECMO. Don't toss the opportunities for RRT out the door just because you may not have thoroughly explored all of them at this time or your RT school did not provide information about RT as a career and not just a stepping stone to nursing. I think the OP deserves to hear some positive points about being a Respiratory Therapist also.

I have already PM'd you. There is no slander here. You are a young RT who at this time seems to not know the potential his profession holds and YOU are reluctant to find out from those who are Respiratory Therapists as a career and have discovered ways to find opportunities without going into nursing.

I also advise the OP to get a student membership with the AARC which is not very expensive and ask questions of those who work in NICU and on transport teams of various types. Many may have had the same conflicts and can now explain from experience why they chose one over the other or did both.
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#14 FloridaMedic

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Posted 29 January 2012 - 02:28 PM

Seriously???? Please enlighten the forum as to how this highly subjective accolade is bestowed upon an individual RT? Can you provide the criteria the AARC has established for this honor? The last time I checked, the Nursing and Paramedic profession did not have any criteria for such an accolade.

Thanks!
JW



Have you never had a favorite author or read research being done at different facilities? Ever been to seminars and enjoyed the speaker and wanted to read more of his work? Do you even pay attention to what others are doing in the world of medicine? The RT website also includes phyicians who are actively involved in the profession and the medical directors. There are also managers of RT departments which are cutting edge. EMS has their "superstar" departments like Wake County and Seattle.

I also differ with you for nursing and EMS. There are nurses who fill up a conference auditorium very quickly. EMS has it stars who write regularly for the web magazines and author books. If you have ever been to an EMS seminar you will see which lectures fill up faster then others when a certain speakers are there and which booths have the bigger crowds.

My advice to you is to read more medical research journals. Attend an EMS conference. Find out who the movers and shakers are in the industry. Medicine changes. It does not stay the same as it was 10 years ago when you go your Paramedic cert although many places haven't changed their practice in over 10 or 20 years very much. Find out what is happening around you and who is making it happen.

Drop the attitude that you know everything and you might learn something. You are a piss poor role model if you don't encourage someone to get more involved with their profession or the world of medicine by listening to or reading about those who have made a difference.
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#15 Jwade

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Posted 29 January 2012 - 03:41 PM

Have you never had a favorite author or read research being done at different facilities? Ever been to seminars and enjoyed the speaker and wanted to read more of his work? Do you even pay attention to what others are doing in the world of medicine? The RT website also includes phyicians who are actively involved in the profession and the medical directors. There are also managers of RT departments which are cutting edge. EMS has their "superstar" departments like Wake County and Seattle.

I also differ with you for nursing and EMS. There are nurses who fill up a conference auditorium very quickly. EMS has it stars who write regularly for the web magazines and author books. If you have ever been to an EMS seminar you will see which lectures fill up faster then others when a certain speakers are there and which booths have the bigger crowds.

My advice to you is to read more medical research journals. Attend an EMS conference. Find out who the movers and shakers are in the industry. Medicine changes. It does not stay the same as it was 10 years ago when you go your Paramedic cert although many places haven't changed their practice in over 10 or 20 years very much. Find out what is happening around you and who is making it happen.

Drop the attitude that you know everything and you might learn something. You are a piss poor role model if you don't encourage someone to get more involved with their profession or the world of medicine by listening to or reading about those who have made a difference.



Nothing you just wrote answered my question! You resorted to an ad hominem attack because you got called out.

Furthermore, I do NOT have a paramedic CERT, Mine specifically says LICENSE . I would be happy to send you a copy. In the big picture, it does not really matter.

I fail to see the correlation between being a good public speaker and being a " Rock Star" clinician. My Grad School Law Professor was a top notch educator, however, he told us the first day of class he never did very well in court! LOL......So....Just because the " Movers & Shakers" can speak well, or fill a 100 seat auditorium, does not impress me at all, highly subjective, and just because you write a book does not guarantee any sort of competence.

George W. Bush wrote a book, He was a documented C student and cemented his place in history as the WORST president EVER!

Cheers!
JW
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#16 Gila

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Posted 29 January 2012 - 03:45 PM

I know Tom and he certainly does not have a know it all attitude. Also, Tom is very involved with respiratory therapy. If I'm not mistaken, he's also finishing up his BSRT degree.
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#17 FloridaMedic

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Posted 29 January 2012 - 03:51 PM

I know Tom and he certainly does not have a know it all attitude. Also, Tom is very involved with respiratory therapy. If I'm not mistaken, he's also finishing up his BSRT degree.


Gila, the "know it all attitude" comment is to JWade.

For Tom, he still has not acquired enough experience as an RT to offer any positive comment. The "nursing has more opportunities" might be true in some ways but then does that mean RT is not worthy of at least a good positive counterpoint to show it is a decent career choice also?
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#18 FloridaMedic

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Posted 29 January 2012 - 03:58 PM

Nothing you just wrote answered my question! You resorted to an ad hominem attack because you got called out.

Furthermore, I do NOT have a paramedic CERT, Mine specifically says LICENSE . I would be happy to send you a copy. In the big picture, it does not really matter.

I fail to see the correlation between being a good public speaker and being a " Rock Star" clinician. My Grad School Law Professor was a top notch educator, however, he told us the first day of class he never did very well in court! LOL......So....Just because the " Movers & Shakers" can speak well, or fill a 100 seat auditorium, does not impress me at all, highly subjective, and just because you write a book does not guarantee any sort of competence.

George W. Bush wrote a book, He was a documented C student and cemented his place in history as the WORST president EVER!

Cheers!
JW


Did you not take a test to get "certified" aka "cert" before applying for a license? I also have no idea if you are still active and still hold a license when I wrote that but you would still have a piece of paper saying you are "certified".

I still can not believe you have no one in the field of EMS that you would consider worthy of some respect for what they have done. That is just sad that you have not paid attention to what has modeled and shape the profession even before you got your MBA and moved on.

You mean there is not one book in EMS or any part of medicine that you would not recommend to a new Paramedic? That is truly a shame if you can only think of George Bush.

I also did not use the word clinician but that is also part of choosing a speaker, an author or an elected member of a society or organization to represent a profession is looking at their clinical background.

I guess you would consider any recommendation for Will Wingfield's book as rubbish also by your definition. All of the author recommendations and seminar presenters recommended by Sean and TexRN should also be discounted if what you are saying is true.

Maybe you can get Bryan to remove threads like this since in your point of view they have no usefulness. Some of those authors are also speakers as well as clinicians and damn good at all. But, you don't want to see that.
http://www.flightweb...es&fromsearch=1
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#19 TexRNmedic

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Posted 29 January 2012 - 04:24 PM

Wow, and I thought nursing was notorious for eating their young! Way to attack a new and VERY enthusiastic RT. Since I have taken the time to get to know him better, I can say that he is very excited about his career, often exhibited by his curiosity and investigation of evidenced-based practice. As previously stated by Gila, Tom is working on his baccalaureate in RT. He may be seeking thoughs experienced with content external to academia. It may only be my opinion, but your tone does come across as fairly aggressive, adversarial, and often condescending. You seem to be a valuable, experienced and enthusiastic RT, but unfortunately not approachable.

Now looking at the original post, this corpsman intends to also obtain licensure as an RN as well as RT. I'm sure John could quickly calculate the statistics faster than I could, but there are tremendously more HEMS RN jobs than RT. Depending on where in the country Matt wants to live, there are virtually no prehospital HEMS RT jobs, only interfacility. So, at least relative to HEMS, Tom's statement is fairly accurate.

What might be productive, would be a discussion and direction regarding RT opportunities beyond HEMS. Matt is pondering making a significant academic commitment to obtain dual licensure.


Hello, FlightWeb! I'm a Corpsman in the U.S. Navy, currently going through the Respiratory Therapy program. I will graduate with my AS and my CRT, and will immediately test RRT as soon as I get to my next command. Once I graduate, I'll have just under four years left in my enlistment contract. I'll spend that time wherever the Navy needs me - hopefully in a large hospital so I can get involved in ICU care. During my time in the Navy, I have to get my ACLS, and I want to get my NICU RRT as well (I'm drawn to neonatal care for some reason...I find it fascinating. Just did an article review for class on ventilation techniques on neonatal patients with respiratory disorders, and I must have read the article a dozen times!). I'll also be using the tuition assistance program to begin my degree in Nursing. Once I'm out, I'll use my GI Bill for whatever I have left to finish my degree, if anything is left.

While in the Navy, I'll be getting a 2nd job in the civilian world. That will give me exposure to the civilian way of doing things, and add to my collective experience.

Long term - I have mixed feelings. I do not know if I want to pursue a career in HEMS as a Flight Respiratory Therapist or a Flight Nurse. To be honest, I know practically nothing about Flight RT positions, so some research is needed there. Just thinking about it, it seems Flight RT will lean more towards fixed-wing than helo operations, and I want helo. Why helicopter? I am a passionate aviation enthusiast (especially when it concerns helicopters), and if my color vision was perfect, I'd be torn between flying the darn thing or sitting in the back. I've flown with a HEMS before, and will hopefully be doing a ride along with the local operation near base in January. I've received good advice in the past, but that was a while ago when I was younger and didn't quite ask the right question. This time around I will be better prepared.

I am ready for a long - and enjoyable - road to get to a flying position. I'm not in any rush, and figure it will be a good ten years possibly until I am competitive. My RT experience will not be the right mix to get hired on somewhere once I get my RN - I fully expect to do at least another five years in an active hospital ICU/ER as a RN first. With that being said, I'll be here for a long time poking my head in every now and then reading up and staying "current" with the community. For those of you who fly, thank you for the services you provide to your community and taking the time here to help others achieve their dreams and expand their knowledge.


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#20 RT_TLP

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Posted 29 January 2012 - 04:38 PM

What might be productive, would be a discussion and direction regarding RT opportunities beyond HEMS. Matt is pondering making a significant academic commitment to obtain dual licensure.


Agreed.
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"We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence, therefore, is not an act but a habit" - Aristotle
Tom L. Pietrantonio - RRT, RCP