Jump to content


Photo

Uscg Helo-Crew


  • Please log in to reply
5 replies to this topic

#1 medic4cqb

medic4cqb

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 308 posts

Posted 26 November 2011 - 12:07 AM

Looking for information from anyone on this forum who can provide information (either first-hand knowledge or acquired) about the medical training and capabilities of the Rescue Swimmer and remainder crew aboard the helos serving in the Coast Guard? You can PM me through Flightweb with a response. Thank you in advance for any and all assistance.
  • 0

Steve A., RN, CCRN, EMT-P

"The usefulness of a cup is in its emptiness..."
- Bruce Lee


#2 MA_Flt_Medic

MA_Flt_Medic

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 15 posts

Posted 26 November 2011 - 12:57 AM

AST's are EMT-Bs
  • 0


Nunquam Quietus

#3 Jwade

Jwade

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1405 posts

Posted 26 November 2011 - 03:45 AM

Looking for information from anyone on this forum who can provide information (either first-hand knowledge or acquired) about the medical training and capabilities of the Rescue Swimmer and remainder crew aboard the helos serving in the Coast Guard? You can PM me through Flightweb with a response. Thank you in advance for any and all assistance.



Steve,

All Aviation Survival Technicians take a 3 week EMT-Basic course during A school. If a call comes in for a patient with known injuries or illness requiring care greater than this scope, they will take a corpsman along on the flight who can start IV's, give meds, etc......

There is currently a show on The Weather Channel called Coast Guard - Alaska which focuses on the Rescue Swimmers and also their A school training program. Pretty cool to watch... Here is a link to the show.

Coast Guard - Alaska

Here is another link to the United States Coast Guard Academy which provides more education about AST.

United States Coast Guard Academy

JW
  • 0
John Wade MBA, CCEMT-P, FP-C, RN

"Have the courage to follow your heart and intuition, they somehow already know what you truly want to become" Steve Jobs

#4 medic4cqb

medic4cqb

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 308 posts

Posted 26 November 2011 - 05:07 PM

MA_Flt_Medic,

Thank you for the reply.

John,

Thank you for the elaboration on the ASTs. I've actually seen the show you speak of and rather enjoyed the few episodes I've seen. I never knew the scope of care afforded to the Rescue Swimmers aboard the aircraft in the Coast Guard and was curious. This seems like an interesting career path, but would be nice if they had a more expanded scope, at least paramedic level training. Thank you again gentlemen.
  • 0

Steve A., RN, CCRN, EMT-P

"The usefulness of a cup is in its emptiness..."
- Bruce Lee


#5 Speed

Speed

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1100 posts

Posted 29 November 2011 - 07:34 PM

As far as aviation safety training, survival, and general aeronautical knowledge it can't be beat. If it's a medical career your looking for (or were told that existed) you'll be in for a big surprise, and may end up at Captain's mast because of your frustrations... A lot of the AK's get their EMT as well. At one time the EMT you received wasn't NREMT and well more surprises when you got out in the real world. Those in the know could guide you down a better pathway. Some locations were so that you could volunteer at the local fire/EMS service and was encouraged. Some locations were directed by a Navy flight surgeon and the scope was guided by the victim being enlisted vs. officer vs. civilian, the latter usually getting a ride; tuck and roll into a waiting ambulance. ACLS was impossible to get unless you went outside, and on, and on... The HST's coming along is a new concept to me, 1996-1997 Otis. It really helped if you came in with prior EMS experience, if not you could be led to believe that an AED's reason for existence is to confirm death..CG Sta. Golden Gate. USCG SAR is not EMS or HEMS, whole different animal. Contrary to the norm, paramedics "did" exist in the USCG, but they didn't get that license from the CG and well, you had to have a really good relationship with the flight surgeon and base commander.In all honesty the small boat stations (MLB's, 41's, and RHIB's) see more EMS type of stuff. In some places that IS the ambulance.
  • 0
Mike Williams CCEMT-P/FP-C

#6 Scott_in_NH

Scott_in_NH

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 37 posts

Posted 02 December 2011 - 01:56 AM

As far as aviation safety training, survival, and general aeronautical knowledge it can't be beat. If it's a medical career your looking for (or were told that existed) you'll be in for a big surprise, and may end up at Captain's mast because of your frustrations... A lot of the AK's get their EMT as well. At one time the EMT you received wasn't NREMT and well more surprises when you got out in the real world. Those in the know could guide you down a better pathway. Some locations were so that you could volunteer at the local fire/EMS service and was encouraged. Some locations were directed by a Navy flight surgeon and the scope was guided by the victim being enlisted vs. officer vs. civilian, the latter usually getting a ride; tuck and roll into a waiting ambulance. ACLS was impossible to get unless you went outside, and on, and on... The HST's coming along is a new concept to me, 1996-1997 Otis. It really helped if you came in with prior EMS experience, if not you could be led to believe that an AED's reason for existence is to confirm death..CG Sta. Golden Gate. USCG SAR is not EMS or HEMS, whole different animal. Contrary to the norm, paramedics "did" exist in the USCG, but they didn't get that license from the CG and well, you had to have a really good relationship with the flight surgeon and base commander.In all honesty the small boat stations (MLB's, 41's, and RHIB's) see more EMS type of stuff. In some places that IS the ambulance.


As a former SB Crewmen, and Coxswain (and now Otis very well, I totally agree here. There are medics in the USCG, most are HST's but there are others. (p.s., USCG AIRSTA Cape Cod Clinic Ambulance is now contracting with civilian paramedics....
  • 0
Scott A. Lancaster

"To give our youth an education that shall be American in character - to enable them to act as well as to think - to execute as well as to conceive - "to tolerate all opinions when reason is left free to combat them" - to make moral patriotic, efficient, and useful citizens, and to qualify them for all those high responsibilities resting upon a citizen of this free republic." -GTE