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Defueling Rw Aircraft


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#1 sstamnes

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Posted 19 May 2011 - 11:33 AM

I was wondering if any programs have specific policies addressing the defueling of their RW aircraft in the event of a last minute change in the passenger manifest. (Ex: A parent decides at the last moment that they will not allow a transport unless they accompany the patient and the aircraft is heavy on fuel so as to complete a round trip rather than stopping to refuel for the return trip.) We have specific policies addressing a parent accompanying a child but we have nothing that would address a situation like this.
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Lt. Shaun Stamnes, CCEMT-P

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Green Bay, WI

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#2 rotoratp

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Posted 19 May 2011 - 05:41 PM

Most aircraft operated in EMS have no practical provision for de-fueling. The scenario you propose would be impractcal. there is no reasonable way to de-fuel an aircraft to accomodate extra weight. Sorry.
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#3 JLP

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Posted 19 May 2011 - 10:47 PM

I was wondering if any programs have specific policies addressing the defueling of their RW aircraft in the event of a last minute change in the passenger manifest. (Ex: A parent decides at the last moment that they will not allow a transport unless they accompany the patient and the aircraft is heavy on fuel so as to complete a round trip rather than stopping to refuel for the return trip.) We have specific policies addressing a parent accompanying a child but we have nothing that would address a situation like this.


not the same scenario, but more than once I've been on a RW flight and we had to reduce fuel weight due to temperature, i.e. reduced lift, could not be sure of safe vertical ascent from patient pickup site, usually a hospital helipad . Usually, the pilots simply flew around until fuel weight was down enough to permit a vertical from the helipad, then did a stop at the nearest airport to refuel if needed. On another occasion, we off-loaded equipment that was not needed for the specific call, which was sent down by land EMS or sent cargo later.
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#4 MSDeltaFlt

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Posted 22 May 2011 - 01:53 PM

Pretty much what JLP stated. The only way to DE-fuel an aircraft is to drop weight and/or burn fuel. Plain and simple.
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Mike Hester, RRT/NRP/FP-C
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#5 RT_TLP

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Posted 06 June 2011 - 01:04 AM

If only helicopters had a single point connection.
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#6 Thinking

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Posted 06 June 2011 - 02:43 AM

Back at my last base, if we were at base when the issue came up it was a no brainer, there was a pump and a barrel that was used for defueling thee aircraft. When we were away from base, as was stated before by others we would just burn fuel until we were good to go.
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#7 TransportJockey

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Posted 04 March 2015 - 12:31 AM

From handing over to RW crews in the past, they would take off and fly in circles above the scene if the pt turned out to be too heavy with their current fuel load. And having talked to quite a few crews, that's the general consensus about how to get around weight. 


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