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Unmet Cabin Needs


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#1 blEMS

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Posted 23 January 2011 - 08:06 PM

Hi Everyone, this is my first post on FlightWeb but have been reading various discussions for a long time trying to learn about the EMS & HEMS specifically. A major topic of interest of mine is what is being done currently to utilize some of the latest technologies in these cabins that have added value to the overall objective or support of the EMS tech? I have seen many improvements to stretcher systems etc but am more concerned with regards to aircraft cabin electronics? I'm doing some research for an innovative group who is looking into possibly doing some EMS aircraft interior work in the future. I've heard from management and pilots as to what they would like to see but I'd really like to get some input from experienced Flight Medics and other EMS professionals as to what improvements can be done to these interiors that would add value. Technology has come so far and there are so many things that could be done easier, more efficiently than ever before. For instance climate control and lighting are there better ways, or more efficient ways of dealing with these controls? What about Patient data collection? Is there improved ways to collect this data so that its not typed, or even hand written? What other amenities would you like to see added in a new Air Craft that you haven't seen yet or would like to see in the future?

Thanks in advance!




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#2 amyn407

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Posted 15 February 2011 - 06:33 AM

Hi bIEMS,
That is an interesting question you pose, because those of us in RW have gotten so used to the constraints of our aircraft cabins that we have almost forgotten that they're not fixed entities per se. I mean, speaking for my own program, we're always trying to make our bags, storage systems, and on-board equipment itself work harder and be smaller and more efficient because the aircraft is never going to get bigger. There are those CAMTS-required items that take up a lot of space and are non-negotiable, for example, a backup oxygen source and backup suction. As far as temp control and lighting: yes, you could definitely make improvements there, esp if your program has money to spend when you're ordering a NEW aircraft (oh, the excitement). I would LOVE to have temperature control in the patient care area, as in, set the thermostat to a certain temp and have it be maintained there. How about heated crew seats and heated sled/litter cushion (I have them in my car, why couldn't we have them in the aircraft?) A heated surface for IV bags would be useful & space-saving, so you don't have to carry a fluid warmer.
I would like to have interior lighting that comes on when you open or close a door, then dims over several seconds, similar to a car dome light.
Ventilation that doesn't involve opening a window would be good. Every time you open a window you risk stuff flying out and getting in the rotor.
Regarding in-flight communication, what about an intercom system that has an indicator or status light for every possible plug-in source? That way, if you're not hearing one of your crewmembers, you know if they're having a technical problem (e.g. inadvertently isolated, not connected) or just ignoring you, ha ha.
As far as patient care reports, I'd like to be able to work on them electronically from any device that gets a wireless signal, and I believe that's already possible, just expensive.
What do the rest of you guys think?

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#3 Mike Mims

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Posted 15 February 2011 - 09:57 PM

blEMS,
As for what you are wanting to know about "up-grades" or "improvements" they are available and some have been for years, it's just the cost that is an issue.
Example:
amyn407 remarked about a fluid warmer, in the Bell 230 it was an option as far back as 1994 it was a good idea, but it took-up a lot of space (mostly what was not visible)
Lighting has evolved from halogen bulbs to LED that are NVG compatible, you have track, rotating, multi-bulb etc...
Climate control: This is where money is going to trump patient care and crew comfort. There are programs in-service that still refuse to place any kind of air conditioning in their aircraft and will defend that decision, so if you could lower the cost drastically, that is easy to retrofit, doesn't rob shp from the engine(s) then maybe you might have a market, but doubtful.
Data collection is going to be based off the type of program(s) you have for your patient charting systems. One may not be compatible with another.
I like the heated seats idea........

One of the concerns with electronics in an aircraft is electrical draw in amps.

The problem you may encounter with entering into the aircraft interiors market is the two big companies Metro Aviation and Air Methods have been around for years.
Which doesn't mean you don't have a chance of getting business, it's just going to be difficult because both have signed contracts with RW and/or FW programs that can extend 10, 12 even 15 years. A lot of their products and installations have received STC's from the FAA which is a huge expense..........

Also, some concerns I would have as a program director or someone who is needing an EMS cabin would be;
- Warranty work
What will my down-time be if you are needed.
- Financial strength.
Are you going to be here 5 years from now?
- Your work-force.
Where are they trained, how many years of related experience, FAA certified etc.....
- Type of service contract(s)
Do I have options.
- Inventory
What do you have on-hand vs having to order it.
- Completion time.
Is there going to be a SWAG (scientific wild ass guess) involved.
- What STC's from the FAA do you have or are in the process of receiving?
For some this matters.

Small portable hand-held devices seem to be very popular.
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Mike Mims

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#4 old school

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Posted 17 February 2011 - 06:30 AM

bIEMS,

This past AMTC, ORNGE had one of their new AB139's on display. The entire medical cabin was custom-designed largely with crew comfort and ergonomics in mind, and it had tons of really cool, innovative stuff.

While most of us are never going to work in anything that has even half the cabin space of an AB139, there may be some specific design elements that could be adapted to smaller airframes.

I'd get in touch with them and try to get details on some of the design elements of their new interiors, why they chose them and how they are working out so far.
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#5 Macgyver

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Posted 18 February 2011 - 06:45 AM

I think a key difference is the FAA piece. In Canada and Europe the STC process is a lot easier, cheaper, and MUCH faster. So if your market is the USA - it's going to be ae other hnd tn uphill battle as described earlier. And that's even with assuming the FAA is not unduly influenced by the major firms in the US market already. On the other hand there is a large and rapidly expanding market outside of the US.
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Ken BHSc, RN, REMT-P

#6 old school

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Posted 18 February 2011 - 07:25 PM

I think a key difference is the FAA piece. In Canada and Europe the STC process is a lot easier, cheaper, and MUCH faster. So if your market is the USA - it's going to be ae other hnd tn uphill battle as described earlier.


Good point. Unfortunate.
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#7 Macgyver

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Posted 19 February 2011 - 04:46 AM

I guess proofreding before posting is something I should work on....especially after night flights! :o Should have read as below

I think a key difference is the FAA piece. In Canada and Europe the STC process is a lot easier, cheaper, and MUCH faster. So if your market is the USA - it's going to be an uphill battle as described earlier. And that's even with assuming the FAA is not unduly influenced by the major firms in the US market already. On the other hand there is a large and rapidly expanding market outside of the US.


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Ken BHSc, RN, REMT-P

#8 old school

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Posted 22 February 2011 - 02:02 PM

I guess proofreding before posting is something I should work on....especially after night flights! :o


we knew what ya meant B)
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