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#55 A Hard Day's Night


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#41 SerendepitySaki

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Posted 17 November 2010 - 02:51 AM

baWHOOOOOOOM!

as you turn south to initiate a new orbit, you are passing over a ravine with a narrow creek in the middle, heavy woods on both sides, due east of a large pasture, ....

the evening dusk suddenly turns day bright and a fireball erupts into the sky where the cluster of trailers and campers used to be......
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LET THE WILD RUMPUS BEGIN !!!!!!
Sean G. Smith, RN-Alphabet Soup

#42 Ectopy

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Posted 17 November 2010 - 03:11 AM

Alright Sean - I'll bite.

I'm fairly new to a high volume crit care ground system with ZILCH for flight experience. However my limited knowledge of basic flight safety gleaned from the FP-C/common sense would be to GET THE HELL OUT!

Current concerns would be what kind of gas just exploded, shrapnel coming through windows, shrapnel/foreign bodies in intakes/rotors. I'm not fond of landing too near the scene in the field next to the revine. Who know's what just exploded. Mother of all meth labs? I really don't want to find out the hard way.

This seems seems to be a good time to make a pretty definitive plan of what we're going to do. If this were me, I'd consider high tailing it to the local airport. On the way, get your communications folks to try to contact the local PD/Sheriff to give you a ride to the scene. Can we monitor the local frequency to hear the types of victims reported?

After getting to the airport, grab the bags and ride to the scene and attempt to face to face (w/command) while the pilot flies back to switch out. Might be a good idea to grab the vent/pumps/extra monitor out of the helicopter before the pilot high tails it out. My thinking behind this is that it might take a bit before the new pilot gets back with the A/C and you might be stuck on scene for a long time with multiple patients. Why not use some technology to "set it and forget it" in order to ease/improve the workflow on scene. I'm thinking along the lines of a forward surgical unit type setup until transport resources/backup can get to the scene.

Making the definitive call to go land now is a good idea. If we dawdle around on top of the scene any longer, the pilot's going to time out and we're exposing the aircraft to explosions. Worst comes to worse, the ground units dont need you and you can go back on your merry way (doubtful in light of Sean's info!).

Once again, not an experienced flight guy, just some thoughts.

Matt
MICP/FP-C/n00b
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Matthew George - NREMT-P, FP-C, CCP, Instructor

#43 pureadrenalin

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Posted 17 November 2010 - 03:29 AM

I'll reply via pm about the vmc stuff, don wanna confuzzle anyone.
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#44 Ectopy

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Posted 17 November 2010 - 03:37 AM

Also Sean - any info on incoming weather? If we get socked in on scene want to start making contingencies about getting alternate transport to the burn center. Maybe think about taking by ground to rendevous with an IFR FW program if weather goes below RW minimums on scene.....
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Matthew George - NREMT-P, FP-C, CCP, Instructor

#45 SerendepitySaki

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Posted 17 November 2010 - 03:47 AM

BATS! BATS! BATS! BRACE FOR IMPACT!
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LET THE WILD RUMPUS BEGIN !!!!!!
Sean G. Smith, RN-Alphabet Soup

#46 SerendepitySaki

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Posted 17 November 2010 - 04:16 AM

this would be a very good time to review EPs relating to autorotation, hard landings, emergency shut downs, EPIRBs, etc....


g'night...
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LET THE WILD RUMPUS BEGIN !!!!!!
Sean G. Smith, RN-Alphabet Soup

#47 backseatrider23

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Posted 17 November 2010 - 02:49 PM

Has an official request been made through anyones dispatch at this point. If not a decision needs to be made whether to abort due to pilot time or either provisions need to be made to get an extension in the works. First off stay the heck away from the direct area of the blaze and fireballs. Chances are you have lots propane either from the trailers and this could be a possible meth house type fir due to the rural area etc.

- If a request has been made orbit over land for safety purposes and start making decisions on where to land and set up either a staging area for helos or triage location. ALso something needs to be done to find out about ground EMS. Personally I am not one to orbit a scene, either its a request or not.

A plan needs to be in the works right now it a bunch of what ifs and maybes.

Some definite intel is needed from the ground like # of injuries, types of injuries and pt form (adult/ped).
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Be greatful for today because tomorrow is never promised.

Jay RN, CFRN, NRP, CCEMT-P


#48 JLP

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Posted 17 November 2010 - 02:49 PM

this would be a very good time to review EPs relating to autorotation, hard landings, emergency shut downs, EPIRBs, etc....


g'night...


OK, I was gonna say, we have no business asking a tired pilot to land at an uncontrolled dark unmarked scene at dusk, that's a recipe for a crash. Better to get the hell out and land at the airport, then grab a taxi or helpful cop and head to the scene by land, and send the pilot home to switch out - since most of my experience is FW, I'd be doing that anyway. Even if there's someone who really needs our help, "better one dead than five" - a dead flight crew is just one more problem for the land FD and EMS crews. But, apparently that already went out the window. Given that the pilot likely does not have good depth perception right now (descending to pitch-dark uneven ground with the dusk light to screw up his night vision, creates a classic "black hole" effect), so he's not gonna know for sure when to flare. It's gonna be a very hard landing.
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#49 SerendepitySaki

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Posted 17 November 2010 - 02:58 PM

you simultaneously hear multiple thuds, and a loud bang, as a cloud of bats is startled out of the ravine by the explosion and into your flight path...

BATS! BATS! BATS! BRACE FOR IMPACT!

this would be a very good time to review EPs relating to autorotation, hard landings, emergency shut downs, EPIRBs, etc....
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LET THE WILD RUMPUS BEGIN !!!!!!
Sean G. Smith, RN-Alphabet Soup

#50 SerendepitySaki

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Posted 17 November 2010 - 03:05 PM

so, your next certification exam review/ exam of real life clinical application questions are:

1. Tell me the general emergency shut down procedure in a typical helicopter, and

2. Tell me about EPIRBs...be sure and mention the operational frequency....
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LET THE WILD RUMPUS BEGIN !!!!!!
Sean G. Smith, RN-Alphabet Soup

#51 backseatrider23

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Posted 17 November 2010 - 03:05 PM

Obviously find somewhere to land ASAP, call dispatch delclare an IFE and notify the ground crews of the situation.


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Be greatful for today because tomorrow is never promised.

Jay RN, CFRN, NRP, CCEMT-P


#52 BackcountryMedic

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Posted 17 November 2010 - 11:34 PM

so, your next certification exam review/ exam of real life clinical application questions are:

1. Tell me the general emergency shut down procedure in a typical helicopter, and

2. Tell me about EPIRBs...be sure and mention the operational frequency....


Hope your visor was down.

ELT (the proper term) is the aviation equivalent of the EPIRB (marine) and the PLB (land/recreation). All modern distress beacons transmit on a frequency of 406MHz. The old Fx was 121.5 (civilian) and 243.0 (military). Some transmit on all 3 frequencies, but 406 is the new norm. All ELT's should be registered so search agencies know who and what they are looking for. If the ELT is tied into a GPS then it can transmit lat/long to the search agency, greatly speeding up time to recovery.

The ELT is designed to activate at 4g's, but don't count on it. Variation in crash forces may not activate the system. An ELT manual switch can be found in the cockpit or on the unit itself .

Not a test question, but don't forget your "oh shit" switch on your sat tracking system, if you have one. This system is NOT tied into the international search system, but can be a great aid to your dispatch system (kinda like OnStar).

Standard shut down is: Throttle to off, fuel pumps to off, battery to off, (in that order) then rotor brake if needed, rally at the 12 O'clock position if safe, then rescue and survival mode.
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"If everybody is thinking alike, then somebody isn't thinking" - Patton

#53 SerendepitySaki

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Posted 17 November 2010 - 11:51 PM

hee hee! "vocabularial" slip betraying some of my roots....

thanks for the correction Back Country!

and thanks for the truly EXCELLENT answer...! read and heed folks!

if you're not already certified, you will see those questions again! be prepared to give back the answers Back Country so graciously and superbly provided!
(Remember folks, on the exam, you will see "ELT" not "EPRIB")

exam of real life food for thought question: if the pilot's doing an in-flight emergency shut-down, what might be a good thing to possibly consider before flipping the battery switch to "off"?

everybody ready for the NIMS, modified Parkland and escharotomy goatrope?
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LET THE WILD RUMPUS BEGIN !!!!!!
Sean G. Smith, RN-Alphabet Soup

#54 pureadrenalin

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Posted 18 November 2010 - 02:56 AM

Going to guess.....is it radio last position, or declare a mayday/IFE to the closest TRACON?
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#55 SerendepitySaki

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Posted 18 November 2010 - 03:21 AM

BING BING BING!!!!!!! you win the prize! B)


now, brace for impact.... tomorrow, Mike and I will bring the clinical phase!

break out those Advanced Burn Life Support text books!

don't forget about angel one and the local medics...

http://www.archildre...ices/transport/

http://www.southernparamedic.com/
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LET THE WILD RUMPUS BEGIN !!!!!!
Sean G. Smith, RN-Alphabet Soup

#56 Ectopy

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Posted 18 November 2010 - 05:37 AM

According to their website, Angel one doesn't do scene calls - perhaps they could be convinced?
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Matthew George - NREMT-P, FP-C, CCP, Instructor

#57 Ectopy

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Posted 18 November 2010 - 05:40 AM

Also, looks like there is a 25 bed hospital w/ED a little north of town. Potentially a good spot to get people "off scene" to while waiting for transport resources.
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Matthew George - NREMT-P, FP-C, CCP, Instructor

#58 SerendepitySaki

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Posted 18 November 2010 - 09:37 AM

it's quickly becoming night and there's a helicopter (yours) crashed in the only good LZ near the scene....trust me ...NO ONE's doing scene calls here.... once we get you situated, i suspect you'll be using some of those airport, etc staging ideas y'all were thinking about earlier....



According to their website, Angel one doesn't do scene calls - perhaps they could be convinced?


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LET THE WILD RUMPUS BEGIN !!!!!!
Sean G. Smith, RN-Alphabet Soup

#59 pureadrenalin

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Posted 18 November 2010 - 01:41 PM

Dangit. I knew we should have gone to the airport. Now I've got a pile of paperwork to do........oh well. Let's get our stuff that's salvagable, and get going!
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#60 SerendepitySaki

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Posted 18 November 2010 - 06:10 PM

OK folks.... being as I'm not a Aviation Mechanic, airframe or powerplant, or an Air Crash Investigator.....

here's the down and dirty and please forgive any technical errors (or better yet, correct me off-line, and increase my knowledge base)

we never told you what you were flying so the general damage report for your aircraft and personnel following your autorotation hard landing secondary to multiple bat strikes is as follows:

quick inspection shows:

pilot and crew:
largely intact, various presumable soft tissue injuries

(to make a landing like that, obviously, he was a prior U.S. Navy Pilot ...God Bless Sprag Clutches and Naval Air Station Whiting Field - South...B))


airframe:
tail impacted and has partially broken off
craft landed upright on its skids
cracked chin bubbles, various sprung doors
spread skids, craft is practically belly to ground
note the smell of hot oil
no apparent fuel leaks or open flames

you are approximately 50 yards from the cluster of burning mobile homes and campers... take it from there...."
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LET THE WILD RUMPUS BEGIN !!!!!!
Sean G. Smith, RN-Alphabet Soup