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Army Flight Nurse Career Field


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#21 SickPuppy

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Posted 29 June 2009 - 04:55 AM

I still believe that certain, not all flight medics (enlisted) given the extra training and approved by Command could accomplish the same mission with out having to pull nurses out of an MTF. I have seen circumstances where extra help is needed on RW flights (where a JECC RN would be great to assist with) but why not improve upon something like the Flight Medic course instead of create a new MOS career field?

I just finished the JECC, and there were a handful of enlisted personnel in the course. The problem is that a ventilated patient who us post operative and post resuscitation, or on multiple pressors, is beyond the scope of a flight medic, even if they do take the JECC. The purpose of sending flight medics to the JECC as part of their advanced training seems to be to give them familiarization with critical care transport, not to manage the patient. The fact is there is way too much theory that goes beyond their training, and more importantly, that mission requires experience that flight medics just do not get. It would take too long to train a flight medic to safely manage a critical patient to be practical.

After all the responses and completing the JECC, I do agree that creating a flight nurse career field may not be the best idea, but creating an identifier and placing those nurses on flights with critical patients seems to be a wise start.
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#22 Dustoff1259

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Posted 30 June 2009 - 02:11 PM

I see your point...So a brand new BSN with JECC is much more "experienced" knows "theory" and is safer than a medic who is actually trained in flight medicine? Yes this is happening. I hate the implied incompetence of enlisted medics by people whom themselves lack any real competence.

If all the effort that went into creating JECC was used to develope the Flight medic course, there would be no need for JECC but hey that would kill photo ops, getting away from the MTF, getting to ride in a helicopter and flirting with aviators would it not ? END RANT.quote name='SickPuppy' date='Jun 28 2009, 11:55 PM' post='18146']
I just finished the JECC, and there were a handful of enlisted personnel in the course. The problem is that a ventilated patient who us post operative and post resuscitation, or on multiple pressors, is beyond the scope of a flight medic, even if they do take the JECC. The purpose of sending flight medics to the JECC as part of their advanced training seems to be to give them familiarization with critical care transport, not to manage the patient. The fact is there is way too much theory that goes beyond their training, and more importantly, that mission requires experience that flight medics just do not get. It would take too long to train a flight medic to safely manage a critical patient to be practical.

After all the responses and completing the JECC, I do agree that creating a flight nurse career field may not be the best idea, but creating an identifier and placing those nurses on flights with critical patients seems to be a wise start.
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#23 Macgyver

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Posted 30 June 2009 - 04:28 PM

Wow. Now I would reenlist for that.


Canadian Warrant Officers are all intermediates and awould be paramedics if they got more OB and neo training (and wrote the CIVE exams...)
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#24 Dustoff1259

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Posted 01 July 2009 - 02:15 PM

Macgyver: Interesting stuff you posted. You guys have some good medics up there!
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#25 old school

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Posted 01 July 2009 - 02:43 PM

I see your point...So a brand new BSN with JECC is much more "experienced" knows "theory" and is safer than a medic who is actually trained in flight medicine? Yes this is happening. I hate the implied incompetence of enlisted medics by people whom themselves lack any real competence.

If all the effort that went into creating JECC was used to develope the Flight medic course, there would be no need for JECC but hey that would kill photo ops, getting away from the MTF, getting to ride in a helicopter and flirting with aviators would it not ?


So following this logic, then the utilization of RN's in civilian HEMS must also be all about photo ops, getting away from the hospital, and flirting with aviators?

I know that the enlisted medical field has changed substantially since I was in the Army, but even so I would bet pretty much anything that very, very few flight medics have any critical care experience at all.
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#26 Dustoff1259

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Posted 01 July 2009 - 03:26 PM

Old School: Lets stay within the context of my argument. Civilian HEMS is a good example of highly trained nurses and paramedics working together as a crew on a REGULAR basis. There is never enough postive things to say about the good work of civilian HEMS nurses.

How often in the civilian world do hospital nurses get forced on a flight crew because the flight crew is considered inexperienced or "out of their capability radius"? We both know the answer on that.....

I agree that there are few flight medics that have critical care experience but so do many RNs who are in the Army as well.

This is not a nurse vs medic thing. Im way beyond that . The ultimate concern for me is that service member lying on a litter hoping that someone around them knows what to do for them.
DS1259
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#27 Macgyver

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Posted 01 July 2009 - 08:04 PM

FYI a "6A" Sgt is essentiall as described above, when "6B" admin/leadership training and time-in etc become Warrant Officers - and leave somewhat later with more exp and med training as PA's...

I'm sure there is a current or ret'd Canadian Forces WO on the list somewhere if clarification is needed...
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#28 FlightCare Nurse

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Posted 03 January 2010 - 09:57 PM

Your information is incorrect. There have been Army Flight Nurses and still are. The Institute of Surgical Research has had flight nurses before Vietnam, and have never had an in-flight death might I add. They do flights on fixed and rotary wing (although now it is at least fixed wing for the vast majority). They are also award flight wings to both LPN's and RN's after serving at least one year on the flight team. Really who cares about the badge anyway, doesnt even make a good paper weight once your retired or get out of the service. Army Nurses also can be part of a critical care air transport team (CCAT). I must admit the vast majoriy of the teams are Air Force Nurses. After doing many flights fixed wing and rotary wing, I will say rotary wing transport is typically much more difficult. But any flight can be a goat rodeo if your not prepared.


As a former flight medic for the US Army, a current Nurse for the US Army, having served in multiple theaters, there is NO MOS for a US Army Flight Nurse. There are the JECC Course and several other noted courses, but none provide the US Army Nurse with an ASI or new MOS. Sorry guys! Your facts need to be in order! We can agree that US Army Nurses are providing en route care to wounded soliders, but they do not have the MOS or ASI. The only branch of service that has this MOS is the Air Force.
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#29 Loydster

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Posted 04 January 2010 - 06:44 AM

As a former flight medic for the US Army, a current Nurse for the US Army, having served in multiple theaters, there is NO MOS for a US Army Flight Nurse. There are the JECC Course and several other noted courses, but none provide the US Army Nurse with an ASI or new MOS. Sorry guys! Your facts need to be in order! We can agree that US Army Nurses are providing en route care to wounded soliders, but they do not have the MOS or ASI. The only branch of service that has this MOS is the Air Force.



Flight Care Nurse is correct on this one. The Army does not have a current Flight Nurse MOS. All Nursing is strictly in the field and is all in the third eschilon and back. No Army RN has a MOS to work 1 or 2 eschilon or in the air.
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