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Offshore Helicopter Water Rescue


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#21 HEMSLAWS

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Posted 06 October 2009 - 01:15 PM

Operations Specifications hold the same weight for a Part 135 operator as the FAR's.

The change to A021 has been in effect for several months.

There is a great deal missing from the scenario information in order to determine whether to take the flight request or not. Weather at launch is only about 10% of what I look at. So way too little info. Legal to launch? Looks like it.....but only 1 thing amongst many others to consider.

It is one thing to read a regulation or Standing Operating Procedure or Operations Specifications. It is a whole other beast to apply the information.

It's not as easy as it's been made out to be.
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#22 C3 Inc.

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Posted 07 October 2009 - 05:02 PM

Operations Specifications hold the same weight for a Part 135 operator as the FAR's.

The change to A021 has been in effect for several months.

There is a great deal missing from the scenario information in order to determine whether to take the flight request or not. Weather at launch is only about 10% of what I look at. So way too little info. Legal to launch? Looks like it.....but only 1 thing amongst many others to consider.

It is one thing to read a regulation or Standing Operating Procedure or Operations Specifications. It is a whole other beast to apply the information.

It's not as easy as it's been made out to be.


Thanks everyone for input. I am very happy that you are looking at what "could" happen. We know it is getting cooler as night approaches, dew point may converge, as can have Advection fog foirming when moist air moves over colder ground or water. It is most common along coastal areas but often develops deep in continental areas. At sea it is called "sea fog." Advection fog deepens as wind speed increases (which is the case here, as the wind is going to get worse, giving us a tailwind on the return trip) up to about 15 knots. There is a fine line though, as wind much stronger than 15 knots lifts the fog into a layer of low stratus or stratocumulus.

Another type of fog is Upslope fog, which forms as a result of moist, stable air being cooled adiabatically as it moves up sloping terrain. Here in Hawaii, we have clouds ALL DAY at the tops of the mountains, as is elsewhere in the US near Mtns. Once the upslope wind ceases, the fog dissipates.

OK...We launched, Vis was ok for the time being, landed and picked up the man with minimum injuries (Isnt this always the case...) and are heading back. We now have a strong shift in winds, giving us a tailwind with a 30 knot increase in groundspeed. Good right? Or is it???? Still have 47 SM to go.
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Richard A. Patterson
MBA, NR/CCEMT-P, MICP, FP-C, CFI, CFII, AGI, IGI
Critical Care Concepts, Inc.
www.CriticalCareConcepts.net
Email: info@CriticalCareConcepts.net

#23 admin

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Posted 15 October 2009 - 12:18 AM

The weather pics can be posted directly into the forum. There is no need to logon to another site to view them.

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#24 medic4242

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Posted 18 October 2009 - 07:01 AM

[OK...We launched, Vis was ok for the time being, landed and picked up the man with minimum injuries (Isnt this always the case...) and are heading back. We now have a strong shift in winds, giving us a tailwind with a 30 knot increase in groundspeed. Good right? Or is it???? Still have 47 SM to go.
[/quote]

Very interesting post as I currently work as an offshore medic. A couple of things that are always considered prior to medevac or at least should be for all involved. One thing that is always on my mind is the safety of the flight crew, I mean let's face it if the air crew is in risk given the conditions and you can't safely get your patient off the rig then what are you going to accomplish? Flight crew safety is the most important thing when deciding when to disembark a patient, ok enough said on that one. Second ( I don't know what offshore company doesn't have good quality remote medics working onboard and which do not) in my case myself and a lot of the guys I work with also fly part time and most of us have all the same bells and whistles (classes) that many of you all do case in point as an offshore medic not always having a medevac is always something to think about and that's why if injuries are minor and you keep up good assessments and patient care then if weather conditions are not good to fly in you handle your patient, even if the patient is critical. At my company we have tons of extra goodies port vents, RSI, 12 leads etc. For offshore guys it can depend alot on the local medical control as well, however the safety of all crews is paramount.
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#25 Scott S.

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Posted 27 October 2009 - 06:40 AM

C3,
Thank you for the post. I really enjoy the brain teasers information/ input/ Q&A from everyone. I can tell you that I am not a pilot and do not (as I have seen medical crews do ) pretend to be a pilot. I let our pilots do what they are good at, learning anything I can everyday from them and I share any medical knowledge I am able with them. That being said, I do not go off flying blindly either I am fortunate enough that I fly with great pilots.
I only feel qualified to answer two of the things in this post. I will leave the rest to those that are aviators or more knowledgeable on the topic and will sit back and learn.
1st- you mentioned an ELT being required. ELTís donít work in water or only briefly. I know this from experience.
2nd- All of the crew should know before the launch if there is anything but sunny skies and gentle breezes. It is a safety concern, PERIOD! If there is questionable weather of any kind, the crew should know whatís going on from the pilot and what the particulars are. Example- there is a storm cell you can see but it is moving ahead of you and you will be able to follow it without issue verses oh we are flying right through the damn thing.
Scott S.
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#26 C3 Inc.

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Posted 30 November 2009 - 01:14 AM

C3,
Thank you for the post. I really enjoy the brain teasers information/ input/ Q&A from everyone. I can tell you that I am not a pilot and do not (as I have seen medical crews do ) pretend to be a pilot. I let our pilots do what they are good at, learning anything I can everyday from them and I share any medical knowledge I am able with them. That being said, I do not go off flying blindly either I am fortunate enough that I fly with great pilots.
I only feel qualified to answer two of the things in this post. I will leave the rest to those that are aviators or more knowledgeable on the topic and will sit back and learn.
1st- you mentioned an ELT being required. ELTís donít work in water or only briefly. I know this from experience.
2nd- All of the crew should know before the launch if there is anything but sunny skies and gentle breezes. It is a safety concern, PERIOD! If there is questionable weather of any kind, the crew should know whatís going on from the pilot and what the particulars are. Example- there is a storm cell you can see but it is moving ahead of you and you will be able to follow it without issue verses oh we are flying right through the damn thing.
Scott S.


Very interesting about your mention of the ELT... on our certification exams, it is still be tested about 121.5...but let me add this. With the new generation of 406 MHz Emergency Locator Transmitters, (ELT) which became mandatory February 1, 2009 for Part 135 operators, this would hopefully arm itself in the event of a 4g forward impact or a hand landing, but is not always the case. (As you mentioned, but more especially with the older 121.5)

This newest model does activate 81-83 percent of the time and transmits a more accurate and near-instantaneous emergency signal by utilizing digital technology. This digital 406-MHz ELT also allows search and rescue personnel to have vital information specific to you and your aircraft. But again, what about the 19% of the cases that it does not arm?

Nice point...
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Richard A. Patterson
MBA, NR/CCEMT-P, MICP, FP-C, CFI, CFII, AGI, IGI
Critical Care Concepts, Inc.
www.CriticalCareConcepts.net
Email: info@CriticalCareConcepts.net