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Lear 35 Door


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#1 ironjohn929

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Posted 28 September 2009 - 06:22 PM

I originally posted this in the fixed wing forum, but thought this would get more traffic up here. Thanks for your understanding!

Anybody out there fly air ambulance in a Lear 35? I'm wondering how easy it is to load a patient through the regular size door......that is, NOT through a cargo door. We plan on using the Life Port loading system. Any help would be much appreciated! Thanks!
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#2 C3 Inc.

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Posted 28 September 2009 - 08:37 PM

I originally posted this in the fixed wing forum, but thought this would get more traffic up here. Thanks for your understanding!

Anybody out there fly air ambulance in a Lear 35? I'm wondering how easy it is to load a patient through the regular size door......that is, NOT through a cargo door. We plan on using the Life Port loading system. Any help would be much appreciated! Thanks!


I would contact Aero Jet International in Florida. I know they use a Lear 35 and have the Lifeport. We have them, but dont fly Lears... They are a great bunch of people and are a great resource, and have offered me assistance in the past with various questions. Hope that helps!
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Richard A. Patterson
MBA, NR/CCEMT-P, MICP, FP-C, CFI, CFII, AGI, IGI
Critical Care Concepts, Inc.
www.CriticalCareConcepts.net
Email: info@CriticalCareConcepts.net

#3 fligrl

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Posted 29 September 2009 - 12:48 PM

I worked for Aero Jet for many years and they do fly a 35. It is certainly doable, but can be difficult at times depending on the circumstances, i.e. weight of pt, number of drips or whether they are intubated. You literally lift them on a Reeves Stretcher (heavy duty plastic pliable stretcher with hard boards down the back) by hand and load. Usually the 2 pilots are inside the aircraft to accept and place the pt on the stretcher while you and your partner and hopefully the 2 ambulance crew are on the outside lifting up from the stretcher.
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#4 Medic09

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Posted 29 September 2009 - 05:40 PM

We have a Sprectrum in our Lears, but I would think the challenges you ask about are similar.

We remove the stretcher and load the patient on it at bedside. If we're receiving a patient on the tarmac (occasionally done), then weather permitting we'll bring the stretcher outside to ground and load the patient on it. Patient always gets lifted into the aircraft strapped on the stretcher. It is a bit awkward, and you have to guard the door seals, but it is certainly doable. Lifting is done by the two crew, plus the two pilots, plus maybe the ambulance crew. It helps to roll the ambulance stretcher up to the door in high position. That's for the 'simple patients' with just a few drips, vent (we have a nice compact LTV1200), and monitor/defib (Phillips MRX). Obese patients are a scare. We have a ramp to help the loading, but there really is not good place for it in the aircraft. Patients on balloon pumps also a hassle, and patients have to be loaded head to aircraft tail at this point.

It all takes a little bit of practice. And, since the Lear is pretty narrow, you must remember LIFO, Last In First Out. Once you're all in there, moving stuff around can be tight. If a family member is coming along, they and their bag have to loaded first.

I don't think we have any special trouble with it, aside from the very obese patients. You need one crewmember already in the plane to receive the stretcher and guide it as it is coming in. You need two at the door lifting and feeding it in, and one at the outside end feeding it in.

If you get a chance to do it once with an experienced crew, you'll get it quickly.
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Mordechai Y. Scher
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It's all about kind, competent patient care; and getting home safely to tell about it.


#5 EMTspud

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Posted 11 October 2009 - 07:18 PM

My company has a-35 with a regular passenger door. It can be a pain, but with practice and patience (no pun intended), it can be done easily.
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