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Cct Ambo Design Help....european?


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#1 EMEMTP

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Posted 19 September 2007 - 11:18 PM

I just joined the Web, and any help would be appreciated. I work for a dedicated CCT team at a major hospital. We are looking at purchasing a 3rd unit; perhaps trying a new design idea. The 2 identically spec'd units we have now are problematic and inconvenient when it comes to securing equip for xport (Ferno cot +Pac Rac + LP 12 +Med III Pumps +LTV Vent, jump bags, etc). We perform all interhosp xport types, and average about 200-300 xports per month. We are tearing up our gear; the Pac Racs alone get bent easily and barely last a year with the LP12 strapped to it.

I saw pics in a brochure for the SERVO-I that showed a European CCT Team that used a special ICU type cot with all equip hard mounted below the patient. They rode in a Sprinter type ambo with a ramp for the cot. Can anyone point me in the direction of some good info for this type of cot and ambo?

Thanks in advance.

EM
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#2 Firemed1887

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Posted 20 September 2007 - 01:20 AM

I am not sure about the cot design but I know of one ambulance service that had the Sprinter type ambulance and they were not happy with it. I know that it was one of the original versions by their ambulance maker and not sure what that had to do with their problems. They kept it for less than two years and got rid of it and went to a typical van type for their IFTs. I would ask which ever ambu company that you deal with for a list of service that they sold Sprinters to and make some calls.
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#3 Tmed725

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Posted 20 September 2007 - 05:05 PM

I just joined the Web, and any help would be appreciated. I work for a dedicated CCT team at a major hospital. We are looking at purchasing a 3rd unit; perhaps trying a new design idea. The 2 identically spec'd units we have now are problematic and inconvenient when it comes to securing equip for xport (Ferno cot +Pac Rac + LP 12 +Med III Pumps +LTV Vent, jump bags, etc). We perform all interhosp xport types, and average about 200-300 xports per month. We are tearing up our gear; the Pac Racs alone get bent easily and barely last a year with the LP12 strapped to it.

I saw pics in a brochure for the SERVO-I that showed a European CCT Team that used a special ICU type cot with all equip hard mounted below the patient. They rode in a Sprinter type ambo with a ramp for the cot. Can anyone point me in the direction of some good info for this type of cot and ambo?

Thanks in advance.

EM


Temple University Transport Team in cooperation with AMR developed a fairly decent CCT ambulance. As with all things, there are some things that would be done differently second time around. Many of the changes dealt with safety, no unsecured equipment and upgraded seats, and aircraft type mounting straps/anchors for the IABP/VAD etc.. The one thing I can definitely recommend is to get rid of the POS Ferno litters and pack rack. Strykers new powered litter and monitor rack are the real deal, we were also going through the ferno pack racks every 8-9 months they just were not designed for a monitor like the Zoll CCT or LP12, they I believe were designed to work with the old LP10. Also having multiple litter mounting configurations would be smart for IABP transports. The changing of the litter and rack can be done without significant alteration of your current trucks, also the new powered litters take a load off of your back.

good luck
Dave NR/CCEMTP
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#4 JPatterson

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Posted 21 September 2007 - 07:51 PM

My CCT team just went through designing new trucks (which will be here in a month) and we decided to go with the International medium duty quad-cab chassis for the crew safety factor and designed the back of the trucks so that every piece of equipment was able to be properly secured during the trip. We also have all sliding captains seats with shoulder restraints so that we do not have to unbuckle to reach the pt. We use the Stryker stretchers with the monitor table (which works great) to carry our LP12 and we secure our LTV1200 to the head of the cot when we are out of the rig. During transport the LTV is mounted on a pole in the action area and our pumps are mounted to a pole by the foot of the stretcher.
The big downfall to these huge trucks is the initial cost and city driving. Fortunately for us we mainly transport through rurual areas and wide streets.

I hope this helps
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Jeff Patterson NREMT-P

#5 get in the choppa

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Posted 22 September 2007 - 03:13 AM

On our CCT units, we run a ford E350 or 450 cab with a large box module. Its pretty much a generic type III, but its got good cabinet space for just about everything. We've also got a stryker powerpro hydraulic gurney and we have a stryker monitor\vent mount which you attach after the patient is on the gurney, it goes over their feet and locks into place and has straps to secure the vent\monitor. We have dual folding IV poles that we mount our pumps to, a small set of bags that attach to the back part of the head of the gurney for gloves\EKG leads etc and a metal plate that fills the gap between the wheels and the rear bar of the gurney so we can put the jump bags underneath the gurney and the vent on the back.


Its actually a pretty big gurney rig, I'm glad that we have the hydraulics.
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#6 ParaMike

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Posted 12 November 2007 - 07:24 PM

We had the Stryker electrics with the equipment mounts as well, All I can say is AWESOME. We could get all our gear on the cot and really helped the back strain, especially when loading the pt back in the rig. Also we have the Kodiak chassis under ours and WOW what a ride! We also had the Zoll CCT M-series, MiniMed III pumps by Alaris, LTV950 vents and iStat's. Great combination for CCT.

Good Luck
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"Success that is achieved while ignoring what is ethical & moral has a different name... failure."
Mike Yother, CCEMTP, RN
Children's Hospital at Erlanger - Emergency Department
Chattanooga, TN

#7 FlyingScot

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Posted 13 November 2007 - 01:53 AM

I wonder if what you saw was the LSTAT that the military uses.
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#8 Ectopy

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Posted 22 October 2010 - 02:26 AM

Is this what you meant?

http://www.brk.de/Sc...ort/ausstattung
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Matthew George - NREMT-P, FP-C, CCP, Instructor

#9 SerendepitySaki

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Posted 22 October 2010 - 02:31 AM

http://www.spectrum-aeromed.com/

I just joined the Web, and any help would be appreciated. I work for a dedicated CCT team at a major hospital. We are looking at purchasing a 3rd unit; perhaps trying a new design idea. The 2 identically spec'd units we have now are problematic and inconvenient when it comes to securing equip for xport (Ferno cot +Pac Rac + LP 12 +Med III Pumps +LTV Vent, jump bags, etc). We perform all interhosp xport types, and average about 200-300 xports per month. We are tearing up our gear; the Pac Racs alone get bent easily and barely last a year with the LP12 strapped to it.

I saw pics in a brochure for the SERVO-I that showed a European CCT Team that used a special ICU type cot with all equip hard mounted below the patient. They rode in a Sprinter type ambo with a ramp for the cot. Can anyone point me in the direction of some good info for this type of cot and ambo?

Thanks in advance.

EM


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LET THE WILD RUMPUS BEGIN !!!!!!
Sean G. Smith, RN-Alphabet Soup

#10 FloridaMedic

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Posted 22 October 2010 - 04:07 PM

skip
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#11 FloridaMedic

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Posted 22 October 2010 - 06:34 PM

I saw pics in a brochure for the SERVO-I that showed a European CCT Team that used a special ICU type cot with all equip hard mounted below the patient. They rode in a Sprinter type ambo with a ramp for the cot. Can anyone point me in the direction of some good info for this type of cot and ambo?

Thanks in advance.

EM


http://www.maquet.co...0701_EN_ALL.pdf

If you mean this photo, that looks like one of our hospital stretchers we use to transport high tech ICU patients to the OR and special procedures. Marquet helped us get the necessary brackets and transport kit for this stretcher and the carrier for the Servo-i for the few times we've had to take that ventilator outside of the hospital. Our engineering and biomed departments helped with the additional battery power sources for the other equipment. We have other ventilators such as the LTV 1200 for regular transport situations that are easier to adapt to other stretchers and vehicles.

http://www.maquet.at...1007_en_all.pdf

Contact Marquet for more info and see if they can also put you in touch with the CCTs in Sweden or other European countries. The reps in Sweden usually speak English so you shouldn't have a problem.

SerendepitySaki
These are for you. The other videos on the side are also interesting such as the heliox/Servo-i and APRV.
History of Servo
http://www.youtube.c...h?v=D1ej0USGn_4

APRV
http://www.youtube.c...feature=related

BiLevel
http://www.youtube.c...feature=related
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#12 SerendepitySaki

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Posted 22 October 2010 - 07:31 PM

Thanks FM! i owe you a LOT! i very much appreciate the time you have spent on me!
Habashi RULES!!!!!
i MUST review HFOV vs APRV ASAP!!!!!
we now return you to your regularly scheduled thread...
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LET THE WILD RUMPUS BEGIN !!!!!!
Sean G. Smith, RN-Alphabet Soup

#13 vtach1010

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Posted 29 October 2010 - 06:29 PM

Just some food for thought. If you are able to build a the new ambulance from the ground up you may want to look at the overall design for crew safety as there are currently few regulations that cover the "Box" portion. Here is an article on some new reg that are being evaluated
http://www.ems1.com/...ard-could-mean/
Another good resource for developing a safer ambulance can be found at www.objectivesafety.net
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