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Qi Qa Programming


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#1 yourAVERAGEmedic

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Posted 17 March 2009 - 03:04 AM

What do you do in you organizations QI QA programming? There is a fine difference between the two. How do you ballance QI and QA and the "pride" of flight medicine providers who are already arguably the best in the field?
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Kevin Collopy, BA, FP-C, CCEMT-P, NREMT-P, CMTE


#2 cbaker4481

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Posted 27 March 2009 - 12:52 PM

I will bite at this one, since quality is something no one likes to talk about. We have a Quality manager and every chart that flows through our program is read and you get comments back. Most are very positive, but she has caught a few charts and done some education that may keep me out of court some day. It is never fun to hear what you could have done better, but in the end it makes you and the program better as a whole. She also deals with our other QM filters and you get notes about things like intubations and procedures.
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#3 BackcountryMedic

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Posted 27 March 2009 - 04:18 PM

The best QI programs take a systems approach. They make sure that program is utilized properly, practicing the best medicine and looking for ways to improve the program overall. System wide problems are referred to education for additional training, or management for equipment upgrades or changes in leadership, or the med director for protocol/guideline improvements. Ongoing individual problems are NOT treated with program-wide education, but with individual remediation. If the provider is unwilling or unable to improve then this ongoing history is forwarded to management for discipline. The QI people should NEVER be involved in discipline.

Everyone in flight medicine should have pride. Having pride does not preclude you from improvement, in fact it should predispose you to looking for better ways of "doing it". Anyone who resists multiple attempts at improving within the supportive atmosphere of a good QI program should be referred to management.
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"If everybody is thinking alike, then somebody isn't thinking" - Patton

#4 yourAVERAGEmedic

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Posted 27 March 2009 - 11:17 PM

I will bite at this one, since quality is something no one likes to talk about. We have a Quality manager and every chart that flows through our program is read and you get comments back. Most are very positive, but she has caught a few charts and done some education that may keep me out of court some day. It is never fun to hear what you could have done better, but in the end it makes you and the program better as a whole. She also deals with our other QM filters and you get notes about things like intubations and procedures.



Trip review is really more of a quality assurance measure. How do you structure continuous quality improvement. As in find a benchmark, say this is where we are and this is where we want to be. Monitor it and see if you get there......

Do you have a way to measure if the care you provided was good long term, or if it was effective as you thought it was?
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Kevin Collopy, BA, FP-C, CCEMT-P, NREMT-P, CMTE