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Smallest Neonate Ever Transported?


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#1 FlightRN4911

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Posted 25 February 2009 - 05:41 PM

Last week we transported premature triplets. A was 590g, B was 480 g and C was only 330g. Does anyone know what the smallest neonate ever successfully transported that lived over a week is? 330 has to be close if not THE record?
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#2 medicerik

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Posted 25 February 2009 - 06:57 PM

Last week we transported premature triplets. A was 590g, B was 480 g and C was only 330g. Does anyone know what the smallest neonate ever successfully transported that lived over a week is? 330 has to be close if not THE record?


What are your guidelines as to when to offer resuscitation? I was always taught under 500 grams, don't resuscitate.

Erik
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Erik Glassman, BS, CCEMT-P, FP-C, EMT-T

#3 jobrien

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Posted 25 February 2009 - 10:38 PM

Last week we transported premature triplets. A was 590g, B was 480 g and C was only 330g. Does anyone know what the smallest neonate ever successfully transported that lived over a week is? 330 has to be close if not THE record?

I am curious- are they all still alive and was the team present for the birth?- Tell us more!! It has got to be pretty darn close to some record!
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#4 jwalshfan

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Posted 25 February 2009 - 11:47 PM

Smallest I ever transported that lived (at least I know it was discharged home) was a 400g.

Warren, RN/LP
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#5 FlightRN4911

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Posted 26 February 2009 - 01:42 AM

well I think the weight had a lot to do with the fact that there are triplets. For example.. if there were 5 of them and say 26 weeks, maybe one of them would be 450g. The weight would not be a factor as much as the gestation.. right? anyway. its has been 1 week and one day and the 2 smallest are still hanging in there. actually the 330g is doing better then the 480g. I have not heard of or seen anything that small. From what I understand, its the smallest surviving infant in Duke's NICU ever (heard from a staff nurse, not fact) but I can see that as not hard to believe..

So im looking to see what the smallest EVER transported is???
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#6 LearRRT-CCEMTP

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Posted 26 February 2009 - 05:41 AM

I was always taught that gestation was a bigger determing factor than weight. Development is based on this, I mean I've been in deliveries where we were led to believe the gestational age was older than it was. The neonate would be delivered and we would find determining factors like the eyes were still fused together along with other factors and not resuscitate. In almost all of the Neonatal units I've worked in we have used 24 weeks as the cut off. Anything younger were determined not viable. Now that didn't mean we did not occasionally have overzealous Neonatalogy fellows that would try and resuscitate 22 and 23 weekers but they always turned out bad and gave false hope to parents. I remember many moons ago in my young days I worked with one fellow who constantly did this so one morning as a friendly reminder we all set up an isolete with a petre dish and taped an ETT, lines, ect to it along with setting up a vent, monitor, pumps and such so when we were all on rounds we could point out that he struck again! He got the point after that!
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David W. Garrard, BHS, RRT, RCP, CCEMTP, PNCCT
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AAC - Air Ambulance Caribbean, Inc. D/B/A Flight 4 Life
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#7 Richard

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Posted 28 February 2009 - 10:46 PM

No longer David. Look up "Baby Doe Act" or "Born Alive Infant Protection Act". Though the BD Act was over turned, not providing care to newborns may still be viewed as homocide.

Richard
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Richard P. Mitchell, RRT-NPS
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#8 LearRRT-CCEMTP

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Posted 28 February 2009 - 11:06 PM

No longer David. Look up "Baby Doe Act" or "Born Alive Infant Protection Act". Though the BD Act was over turned, not providing care to newborns may still be viewed as homocide.

Richard


Richard,
Very interesting! I would love to read more about this but I did an online search for "Baby Doe Act" and could not find anything. Could you point me in the right direction?
Dave
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David W. Garrard, BHS, RRT, RCP, CCEMTP, PNCCT
Program Director and Vice President
AAC - Air Ambulance Caribbean, Inc. D/B/A Flight 4 Life
Charlotte Amalie, St. Thomas, USVI

#9 barkyvonschnauzer

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Posted 01 March 2009 - 03:37 AM

Back to the original question---to which I say, "who cares"?. C'mon, all we are doing is moving patients from point A to point B. Now we need to introduce records to validate what we do?  Just because we do something by air doesn't really make it more difficult, does it? The correct answer is, "no". "What is the difference between an SCTU and a helicopter?" 1500 feet.
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#10 insen...

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Posted 01 March 2009 - 05:46 AM

My first thought was why these babies needed transferred?

Did someone drop the ball and fail to ensure these triplets were born in the proper facility?

Or was it an unexpected delivery?

Just curious...and I'm glad it wasn't me.
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"Miserere stultus qui dicit latin." Contemporary French Linguist Insenescence

#11 kidsrrtnps

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Posted 01 March 2009 - 05:50 AM

We have had multiple babies under the 400g mark. From what I can remember in the past 8 years, the smallest we have had to survive was between 310-330grams. All of our NICU babies are transported since we don't have an L and D at our peds hospital.
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#12 kidsrrtnps

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Posted 01 March 2009 - 05:59 AM

From what I could find, the smallest surving infant was 243.8 grams.. . Here is a link...http://www.medicine.uiowa.edu/tiniestbabies/viewrefs.asp?Infant_id_no=67
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#13 kidsrrtnps

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Posted 01 March 2009 - 06:02 AM

http://images.google...htt...v=2&hl=en
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#14 kidsrrtnps

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Posted 01 March 2009 - 06:03 AM

one more!

http://images.google...htt...l=en&sa=X
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#15 FlightRN4911

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Posted 02 March 2009 - 12:04 AM

Yes, unexpected. Mom abrupted. We tried to make it there to assist with the delivery but no luck.
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