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Allowing Parents To Ride In The Ambulance


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#1 NEOPEDSRRT

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Posted 23 January 2009 - 09:07 AM

Hello Everyone,

Currently we do not allow parents to ride in the ambulance on interfacility pediatric transports. I am looking for information on team out there who do or do not allow parents to ride. I am looking for pros and cons. If you do allow the parents to ride, are they in the front or in the back of the rig with the Team. Interesting stories would be greatly appreciated also.

Thanks.
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#2 Macgyver

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Posted 23 January 2009 - 10:13 AM

Hello Everyone,

Currently we do not allow parents to ride in the ambulance on interfacility pediatric transports. I am looking for information on team out there who do or do not allow parents to ride. I am looking for pros and cons. If you do allow the parents to ride, are they in the front or in the back of the rig with the Team. Interesting stories would be greatly appreciated also.

Thanks.


One parent can ride, generally in the cab, in the rear (if both team members agree and a seat is available) occasionally
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#3 jvanhare

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Posted 23 January 2009 - 04:46 PM

One parent can ride, generally in the cab, in the rear (if both team members agree and a seat is available) occasionally

We always let one parent ride, as it is a calming influence for the patient t have mom or dad in back with them.
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#4 jobrien

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Posted 23 January 2009 - 08:56 PM

We always let one parent ride, as it is a calming influence for the patient t have mom or dad in back with them.


We also always allow one parent to ride and usually in the back with the patient like 'jvanhare' said is somewhat calming to the patient. We make sure the parent is belted in throughout. At the team's discretion, the parent may be asked to sit up front. We also do the same for rotor and fixed wing flights as well and make sure they receive a safety briefing before flight.
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#5 Mike Mims

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Posted 23 January 2009 - 08:57 PM

We do not have ground just RW.

Whenever we're en-route for a peds pt, we (as in crew) decide if all of us are OK with a parent riding. If so, the pilot will figure weight allowance.
Once we encounter the pt and family, we'll address the emotional state of Mom and/or Dad and determine if asking is even warranted.

However, this is a situational based decision and if for ANY reason there is a question as to a possible risk involved we'll decide as a crew yes or no.

If they are riding, we'll select where they will ride (front or back) the pilot will give them a safety briefing and prepare for transport.

When we do take a parent, we know they are in good hands and this might be that one chance that the parent can take a break, just have some time to reflect and get their thoughts together, also maybe just have little peace......
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Mike Mims

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#6 JLP

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Posted 23 January 2009 - 09:30 PM

We do RW, FW and ground, and it is routine to bring one parent as long as there is no problem with weight (for the RW, especially in summer) or space, in fact our call-takers usually get the parent's weight along with the other call details to give to the pilots so that they can determine if it there is any problem taking the parent.
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#7 fire_911medic

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Posted 24 January 2009 - 01:06 AM

As far as the ground side of things, our trucks are split cabs with the window, so allowing a parent to ride is usually very little problem. If I end up in another service's ambulance (which has happened more than once for various reasons) that is a walkthrough, if the door locks from my side, then I'll still go with it, if not then absolutely not. On more than one occasion, I have had a panicky parent try to climb through even a window to get in the back when they thought things weren't going well. The parent must be reasonably calm. I would never allow a parent in the back with the team creates a cramped space and can have chaos which I don't invite. I can see the benefit of the occasional transport where a parent present would be beneficial, but I think the risk of the parent panicking is more than an unhappy child IMHO.
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#8 CCEMTP12

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Posted 25 January 2009 - 01:38 AM

We allow the parent to ride with us also. They are able to ride in the front of the ambulance for saftey reason the don't ride in the back.
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#9 NEOPEDSRRT

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Posted 27 January 2009 - 11:56 PM

Hello Everyone,

Currently we do not allow parents to ride in the ambulance on interfacility pediatric transports. I am looking for information on team out there who do or do not allow parents to ride. I am looking for pros and cons. If you do allow the parents to ride, are they in the front or in the back of the rig with the Team. Interesting stories would be greatly appreciated also.

Thanks.


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#10 buffettrn

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Posted 28 January 2009 - 04:36 PM

In the past when I did mostly adult and an occassional child transport we did not take family on any emergency transport and only in the front for the stable run, but we tried to discourage even that practice. Now that I have evolved into the pediatric world, my options have changed. Parents always ride in the patient compartment of the ambulance, securely belted in place. We use two vendors for our aircraft and families do not come in either aircraft.
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Jeff Fein
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#11 kidsrrtnps

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Posted 29 January 2009 - 03:03 AM

We allow 1 parent to ride along for ground transports. They are always placed up front. For rotor, we take a parent if weight/emotional condition of parent is acceptable. We fly EC 135 and have 3 crew members plus pilot so there are times we don't have the weight allowance to do so.
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#12 edrnemtp

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Posted 03 February 2009 - 07:45 AM

We are fixed wing, and allow a parent to fly with the patient, same for our ground transports. Usually, not 100% though, helps keep the child calm.
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#13 djkelly

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Posted 03 March 2009 - 01:40 PM

Does anyone know of any research regarding allowing vs not allowing parents to ride along (especially in Rotor wing). I am in grad school working on an ethics paper regarding whether or not parents should be transported along w/ their sick child

Thanks
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#14 k9medic

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Posted 08 March 2009 - 12:07 AM

The program that I fly does not allow a parent to ride along. Too much potential for an "unknown" variable.
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#15 flygirl

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Posted 29 March 2009 - 11:05 PM

Hello Everyone,

Currently we do not allow parents to ride in the ambulance on interfacility pediatric transports. I am looking for information on team out there who do or do not allow parents to ride. I am looking for pros and cons. If you do allow the parents to ride, are they in the front or in the back of the rig with the Team. Interesting stories would be greatly appreciated also.

Thanks.


We allow a parent or parents to ride up front. They are not permitted to ride in the back. We do not allow parents to fly back with us in R/W but do allow one of them to fly back with us in the fixed wing. I have personally found it to be more calming for the patient when the parent rides up front which is the opposite of some of your responses.
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#16 djkelly

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Posted 08 April 2009 - 12:56 PM

Does anyone have and research and or articles related to transporting Parents along with pediatric pts.... I am working on a ethics project for grad school.
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#17 MbolesRN

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Posted 09 April 2009 - 03:30 PM

We, as transport policy, do not allow parents to ride. We are ground only (hospital based PICU from a peds hospital). We really have never had problems. Some parents really push the envelope asking, but we always reassure them that the kids do well (calm down) once they are in the ambulance away from the parents. I have never had a child not calm down.

Only on one or two occasions, due to distance and transportation issues, have we allowed them to ride. In these instances, they were required to sit up front, and prior approval had to be obtained from the medical control.
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#18 Thinking

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Posted 09 April 2009 - 06:07 PM

I take parents with me whenever I possibly can, I find it's way easier on the kid, and the parent as well. I've always thought of the child and the parent as one unit, and bringing them along provides a great deal of comfort to both. I have never had a parent get in the way or interfere in any manner in 9 years of flying in areas with fairly high volumes of peds calls.
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#19 Mark G RRT

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Posted 20 April 2009 - 05:15 PM

It is standard for us to allow 1 parent to ride along in the passenger cabin on ground transports. The team decides on exceptions, usually based on pt acuity and team composition (which basically means there is no physical space in the back of the bus). We otherwise have no problem with parents riding along. We value their calming effect they have, and with patients who have complex medical background (lots of our patients), the parents is the primary caregiver and we very much value their knowledge and assistance. We allow a parent along on FW transports, again as space and acuity allows. This is especially important, as the parents ground travel time is obviously significantly longer, thus seperating child and parent for longer times. Bringing the parent back is also helpful if any emergent surgery or intervention is needed, as the MD can get a much better informed consent face-to-face with the parent when they come back with us. Parents are not allowed on RW transports, however there has been a few exceptions since I have been on transport. Those are very special situations that have to be specifically approved by the pilot, and require compelling reasons by the transport staff.

I have never seen a parent become unruly on transport, and I have coded a patient with a parent sitting up front. Parents are obviously required to be secured.

Team background: approx 1500 transport per year, 85% ground 9% RW 6% FW. Team=RN, RT 85-90% of the time, with an MD for the remainder.

Mark
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#20 Eric Woods

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Posted 26 April 2009 - 09:08 PM

We are 100% pediatric, and we try to take a parent along of at all possible on all 3 modes of Transport. On ground, we have hem ride up front almost all the time. We, too, have found that the patient becomes more calm more quickly when you separate them from the added emotional stress that the parent usually brings along. Baring physical or emotional limitations, I could not, however, understand why a program would not allow the parent along. On rotor, we take them if they can deal with it emotionally, can speak and understand English, and we have the capability to carry the added weight. On FW, the same applies.

On more than a couple of occasions, I have transferred care of the child to the receiving unit and the child has died soon after. How would you not allow the parent to be there for one last kiss or to say goodbye. Our program and health system is very focused on family centered care. This involves having the patient's primary caregiver around as much as possible.
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J. Eric Woods, RN, BSN, NREMT-P, CTRN