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Weather Minimums- Ground


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#1 overunder

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Posted 17 August 2007 - 05:55 PM

Hey all,
We are a service doing Air and Ground Transports. While there are many resources on Air limits (IFR and VFR rules), we are looking at what folks consider as a stop point with regards to incelement weather, such as Winds above 45 or 60 miles/hour, x inches of water, can you see more than 2 funnel clouds through the windshield? ;-)
I would appreciate all and any input, private, ems, specialty teams et al.
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#2 jwalshfan

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Posted 19 August 2007 - 02:26 AM

Still? :rolleyes: :blink:

Warren, RN/LP
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#3 St Fuz

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Posted 19 August 2007 - 02:40 PM

Come on Warren, you know things here never change.
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#4 J_oz

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Posted 21 August 2007 - 08:22 AM

Ground transports by us are "lways a go" we will drive in anything. I know of some members that will delay a transport to look for beter weather but when the airships are down the ground unit is inroute
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Jason O. BS, RRT, EMT

Critical Care RCP

#5 allison

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Posted 21 August 2007 - 08:50 AM

Morning, I've been told no go if winds sustained at 45mph r/t high profile vehicle. Other than that? Now the driver does have final say, but we haven't had to pull over, just drive very slowly cause couldn't see the exit for the rain :P .
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#6 ACS2004

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Posted 22 August 2007 - 01:54 AM

Freezing rain we suspend all operations - ground and air. Other limitations are at the crews discretion. Some due to decreased visibility from snow or fog, others would be the condition of the roads.
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#7 chris

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Posted 22 August 2007 - 10:43 PM

Sustained winds 45 mph or over no go. Ice and snow covered roads are a case by case basis depending on the driver and crew 3 to go 1 to say no theory still applies.
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#8 xjaygeex

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Posted 04 September 2007 - 02:24 PM

Our team is also in the process of writghting protocols for weather min. At this time for our out of town trips (>40 miles) we, call CDOT for road and weather conditions. Then the team makes the call to transport or not. 3 to go 1 to stay. Drive safe.
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#9 Captainbrack

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Posted 04 September 2007 - 10:56 PM

Pretty much agree with everyone else. "Driver in command" as to if we go or not; but I work down in Texas and I can't remember a time we refused a transport due to weather. Have had to pull over a couple of times when the rain was going sideways (there might have been a cow also going sideways :) ). We make sure everything is just as secured in the ambulance as in the fixed or rotor wing.
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Brian Hill RRT,RN
Pediatric Critical Care Transport Team
dell Children's Medical Center of Central Texas
Austin Texas

#10 xjaygeex

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Posted 05 September 2007 - 04:05 PM

Take a look at this transport. You respond to a rural hospital 1.5 hours from your destination. (In good weather) Your PT is a 30 yo G3P1 29wk gest. Last cervical check was 4/50/-1 with hour glassing
and bulging membranes. Pt has been Tx. with first dose of Betamethasone. and a 6gm bolus of Mag then a Mag gtt at 2gm/hr. Her contractions have slowed from 1-2min and 10/10 pain to 8-10min 2-3/10 pain. FHR are 140-160 good long/short variability no dcells noted. Now time for the weather report, moderate snow with 20-30mph winds. The roads are wet. Not that big of a deal right? Well when you get 20miles from the rural hospital the weather changes just a little. The wind had pick up to 30-35mph and the roads are getting some snow covered spots. The blowing snow now makes visibility about 300 ft. Our crew talked it over. The driver felt Ok with driving with the current weather conditions. Weather/road conditions were rechecked with CDOT (Colorado Det. of Transportation) we got the same report that we got at the beginning of the transport. PT was packed and loaded for transport. 12 miles into transport the driver lost control. The ambulance did a 180 and stopped in the ditch. (upright thank god). The weather had gotten worse when we were loading the PT. Winds were now 40-45mph visibility was down to 200feet and the roads were snow covered. The odd thing is that 5 miles down the road the weather was much different. Light snow, wet roads, light winds. In retrospect we should have turned this call or at least delayed transport. This incident had increased your awareness of the impact of weather on ground transport. I feel some people have a lack of concern for weather and ground transport. Don't let the fact that you are on the ground lower your safety standard. FYI the PT did make it to her destination that day. Her labor was controlled and she delivered at 36 weeks.
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#11 josh.dickson

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Posted 19 August 2008 - 03:52 AM

Just like the Aircraft, three to go, one to say no. No questions asked.
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"Anesthesia: the fine line between agony and apnea."

-Josh Dickson FP-C, CCEMT-P

#12 mjcfrn

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Posted 25 August 2008 - 10:49 PM

Pretty much agree with everyone else. "Driver in command" as to if we go or not; but I work down in Texas and I can't remember a time we refused a transport due to weather. Have had to pull over a couple of times when the rain was going sideways (there might have been a cow also going sideways :) ). We make sure everything is just as secured in the ambulance as in the fixed or rotor wing.


Sometimes a cow, sometimes a tractor, sometimes a barn.... :D
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#13 fire_911medic

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Posted 01 September 2008 - 11:58 PM

With us transport acceptance requirements depend upon the crew involved's comfort level with the weather conditions current or expected. I have terminated a transport mid run before because it was just too dangerous - we diverted to an outlying hospital until better weather when we continued on. In general, we run when the birds are grounded due to weather, but with us all have to agree to take the transport and if one says no, we don't go. Also, our dispatch is different than most ground I believe in that we don't receive info until we actually agree to accept the transport (provided it's not a scene dispatch as occasionally we will be contacted to respond on scene within our county during which any weather is okay to respond). We don't maintain hard and fast rules for refusal, but in general, if visibility is poor or they have closed the interstate, we don't accept transports. Crew and patient safety is at the forefront of our program and I'm glad to be a part of it ! Our drivers are fantastic, with great experience and safety records I feel comfortable anytime they say let's go 'cause I know they have considered all the factors involved before we say yes. Too bad more out there aren't like that.
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