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Fixed-wing With Multiple Patients


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#1 captjoe

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Posted 16 April 2008 - 08:48 PM

Interested to know how many fixed wing air ambulances are equiped with 2 or more patient sleds and how often flights are made with 2 or more patients? Does each patient require a dedicated medical team? Also, is anyone aware of regional airline equipment like a BAe 31, Beech 1900 or Dash 8 being used to transport 4, 5 or more patients. I have flown a BE200 and LJ35 and they were both equiped with one sled.

Thanks in advance for your replies,

Captjoe
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#2 sammedic

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Posted 16 April 2008 - 10:39 PM

I used to fly with multiple patients. Each of the FW AC had the ability to accomodate up to 2 sleds or 1 sled and an incubator. The RW could accomodate up to 3 patients ... technically ... but we would only transport 2 since we needed to put our equipment somewhere (no medical interior). LJ31A, KAB200, 412

Multiple patients would be transported with one medical crew (ALS/BLS provider). The only exception to this was when both patients were serious to critical. In those cases, we would arrange to have an ALS/ALS team (PA-C/EMT-P or PA-C/PA-C or EMT-P/EMT-P). We would not transport a vent patient with another patient that was not serious to critical (or total BS).

I will not say that the way that we did things was the optimal way ... just the way that it was done. Sometimes the flights with multiple patients were difficult.
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#3 chris

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Posted 17 April 2008 - 12:55 AM

We can do two patients in a Beech 209 that we have. We obviously have to have a provider for each.
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#4 vferebee

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Posted 17 April 2008 - 04:15 AM

We have 2 Gulfstream G-111's with factory cargo doors that easily accomodate 4 Spectrum beds with the capacity to carry 6. Our usual configuration is 1 stretcher with 8 seats. We have transported 2 or more patients on very few occasions.
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#5 Macgyver

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Posted 17 April 2008 - 07:33 AM

I also used to fly with multiple patients. Each of the FW AC had the ability to accomodate up to 2 sleds or 1 sled and an incubator. King Air B200 / B200C / A100 / 100. In the Twin otter we could take 2 criticals or 6 stretcher cases and still have 6 seats for providers, equipment and escorts.

Multiple patients would be commonly transported with two medical crew (CCT providers). The only exception to this was when both patients were minor. In those cases, we would use a single CCT provider. We would not transport a vent patient with another patient that was not serious to critical (or total BS). All maternity transports went with an incubator and a second crew (not for in-flight delivery, but so we could deliver at the sending if it was too far along and then take both patients out - the NICU team refused to fly into our region...)

I will not say that the way that we did things was the optimal way ... just the way that it was done. Sometimes the flights with multiple patients were difficult. And 2 patients was by no means the limit. I have had to take 3 RSV kids (stable) by myself during an epidemic, and I remenber a 2 provider 4 patient trip (post partum, twin 32 weeks, and a "walk"-on fractured tib/fib
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Ken BHSc, RN, REMT-P

#6 slim

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Posted 17 April 2008 - 03:09 PM

Our program flies a King Air 200 and does both single and two patient transports. We generally will take 2 teams for 2 patient transports. We have the capabilities to take upto 5 medical crew members with 2 patients. We average 1-2 two patient transports per month. Most of these transports are for trauma or burn patients and occassionally OB and NICU teams.
Jason
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#7 nws2002

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Posted 17 April 2008 - 09:23 PM

Tyrol Air Ambulance in Austria has Dornier 328JETs that can take up to 10 patients. That acft would normally seat 32 in an airline configuration.
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#8 Michael Collins

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Posted 18 April 2008 - 02:10 AM

I've been in several aircraft configured for two stretcher patients. LJ35A, King Air B200, Citation 550, Citation 500 with Eagle Mod (tight in this one), all with a double LifePort. Also Westwind with two Egan stretchers (one on each side, staggered fore and aft).
Never had to augment the crew above the normal two.

There was a nice article about the Province of Quebec's dedicated air ambulance (EVAQ) in the Air Medical Journal about a year and a half ago. I think they fly a Challenger 600 series configured for 5 stretchers.
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#9 C9S

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Posted 05 July 2008 - 05:30 AM

We often have 2 or 3 in a B200 with dual life ports. With 3 obviously one has to be an easy case, they sit. We always fly with a flight nurse and a medic. I have also often flown with two in a Caravan with dual life ports.
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#10 KingAirNLA

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Posted 05 July 2008 - 11:19 PM

We are equiped to take 2 stretcher pts in our Super King Air 350 (dual lifeports) as well as 2 walk on's. However on 80% of the flights we only take one Pt. When we do carry multiple pts we only take one critical/vent case. If there is more than one critical case being transported we take a third crew member.

We normally fly with a nurse/medic crew.
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