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Ground Cct Jobs?


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#1 get in the choppa

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Posted 19 March 2008 - 08:08 PM

I've worked in California for a few years, there's a really weird (stupid in my opinion) ground CCT system here. Ground teams consist of a CCT RN and 2 CCT trained EMT-B's. I'd like to find CCT job where its RN\EMT-P.

I first worked in an ER, then on a 911 ambulance for 2 years. I got into the CCT program (which was an interview\administration appointed position only) and the EMT's had to go through classes on ACLS, the infusion pumps, vent, IABP, LVAD. I have no idea why they didn't just use medics, probably because EMTs are less expensive. The EMT B's were allowed to only set up all of the settings for all of the equipment, then the RN would double check and physically switch the stuff over. Anyways I worked on CCT for roughly 2-3 years and decided to become a medic during that time. Once I became a medic I could no longer work on CCT. There was a CCT-P unit here for a very short period of time, but it was shut down due to poor training of the dispatchers and the contracted hospitals always specifying that they wanted an RN, even for stabilized patients on heparin gtts.

Anyways, I'm really itching to get back into CCT. I know I don't have enough time in as a medic to get on a helicopter, but as dumb as it might sound, I learned a lot from being on CCT, even at the EMT level.
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#2 FloridaMedic

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Posted 19 March 2008 - 11:14 PM

I've worked in California for a few years, there's a really weird (stupid in my opinion) ground CCT system here. Ground teams consist of a CCT RN and 2 CCT trained EMT-B's. I'd like to find CCT job where its RN\EMT-P.

I first worked in an ER, then on a 911 ambulance for 2 years. I got into the CCT program (which was an interview\administration appointed position only) and the EMT's had to go through classes on ACLS, the infusion pumps, vent, IABP, LVAD. I have no idea why they didn't just use medics, probably because EMTs are less expensive. The EMT B's were allowed to only set up all of the settings for all of the equipment, then the RN would double check and physically switch the stuff over. Anyways I worked on CCT for roughly 2-3 years and decided to become a medic during that time. Once I became a medic I could no longer work on CCT. There was a CCT-P unit here for a very short period of time, but it was shut down due to poor training of the dispatchers and the contracted hospitals always specifying that they wanted an RN, even for stabilized patients on heparin gtts.

Anyways, I'm really itching to get back into CCT. I know I don't have enough time in as a medic to get on a helicopter, but as dumb as it might sound, I learned a lot from being on CCT, even at the EMT level.


What experience do you have at the Paramedic level? Have you worked in 911 system as a Paramedic? How many intubations and IVs do you average per month? How many times have you been lead on a truck? Is your Paramedic from a degree or certificate program?
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#3 Jwade

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Posted 19 March 2008 - 11:41 PM

I've worked in California for a few years, there's a really weird (stupid in my opinion) ground CCT system here. Ground teams consist of a CCT RN and 2 CCT trained EMT-B's. I'd like to find CCT job where its RN\EMT-P.

I first worked in an ER, then on a 911 ambulance for 2 years. I got into the CCT program (which was an interview\administration appointed position only) and the EMT's had to go through classes on ACLS, the infusion pumps, vent, IABP, LVAD. I have no idea why they didn't just use medics, probably because EMTs are less expensive. The EMT B's were allowed to only set up all of the settings for all of the equipment, then the RN would double check and physically switch the stuff over. Anyways I worked on CCT for roughly 2-3 years and decided to become a medic during that time. Once I became a medic I could no longer work on CCT. There was a CCT-P unit here for a very short period of time, but it was shut down due to poor training of the dispatchers and the contracted hospitals always specifying that they wanted an RN, even for stabilized patients on heparin gtts.

Anyways, I'm really itching to get back into CCT. I know I don't have enough time in as a medic to get on a helicopter, but as dumb as it might sound, I learned a lot from being on CCT, even at the EMT level.


Hey,

I worked on a ground CCT rig back in Michigan.. Dual CCEMT-P's, and we did 911 stuff when not on CCT! Worked out very well....We did Balloon pumps, LVAD's, vents, multiple vasoactive drip's etc........Never had or needed an RN at all....On rare occasion, a perfusionist would want to come along for the ride!

A heparin / Nitro / Integrilin patient was a standard run of the mill ALS transfer........NO special CCT needed for that! We had a great, involved med director, and QA, as well as ongoing training! None of this is Rocket Science by any means, I think a program needs to have the support structure in place to run this type of program!

Respectfully,
JW
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John Wade MBA, CCEMT-P, FP-C, RN

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#4 USDalum97

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Posted 20 March 2008 - 07:41 AM

Not all systems in CA are the same. How much medic time do you have? Seems like you have been in EMS for a while.

You have a PM. Let me know if I can be of any help.
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#5 get in the choppa

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Posted 20 March 2008 - 01:52 PM

Functioning paramedic I have roughly a year of 911 and ALS transfer experience. As far as intubations, I've had about 13 in that time. We run EMT\Paramedic, and the transporting medic is always the lead. IVs come pretty, at least 2-4 a day (4-6 calls per day call volume). The program I went through is both a degree and a certification program, but I still need a few more units to get the actual degree.

I've since started working on a bachelors in biology\pharmacology (I actually started on my bachelors during paramedic school) and now live 2 hours from the school that offers the degree. The program requires the last 10 units to be taken physically at the school to get the degree, and that 2 hour drive every day is a problem. I was thinking of going part time over the summer and just knocking it out.

Dual CCT-Ps? That would be awesome! California's so restricted that I don't think that there would be any way around the state protocols to have something like that even be fathomable.
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#6 medic18lt

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Posted 15 June 2008 - 02:10 AM

I have worked ground CCT for 3 years in Ohio. We currently run a CICP (Certified Intensive Care Paramedic), a RN, and our driver is either a Basic or Advanced EMT. Our program requires all staffing to go through the CICP class minus the Basic who does have to sit in on some of the classes to have an understanding of the equipment that we use. Our medics and RN's have to have at least 3years experience. In the next few months we are launching our new rotor wing service that will work along with our ground MICU unit. When this launches the CICP's will required to obtain there FP-C and the RN's there CCRN or CEN. Our service has been running ground MICU for about 10 years. I can't understand why anyone would want to have a ground unit running with a EMT-B and a RN what happens if the patients goes down the tube and needs a ETT, can the nurse do that, I know here they can't. It just sounds really weird to me. We did run duel medic and RN but switched due to a shortage of Medics in our area. Is the protocol in Cali that bad.
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#7 Mike Mims

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Posted 16 June 2008 - 03:42 AM

I have worked ground CCT for 3 years in Ohio. We currently run a CICP (Certified Intensive Care Paramedic), a RN, and our driver is either a Basic or Advanced EMT. Our program requires all staffing to go through the CICP class minus the Basic who does have to sit in on some of the classes to have an understanding of the equipment that we use. Our medics and RN's have to have at least 3years experience. In the next few months we are launching our new rotor wing service that will work along with our ground MICU unit. When this launches the CICP's will required to obtain there FP-C and the RN's there CCRN or CEN. Our service has been running ground MICU for about 10 years. I can't understand why anyone would want to have a ground unit running with a EMT-B and a RN what happens if the patients goes down the tube and needs a ETT, can the nurse do that, I know here they can't. It just sounds really weird to me. We did run duel medic and RN but switched due to a shortage of Medics in our area. Is the protocol in Cali that bad.

That's the advantage of being a part of a CC transport team.
You have the training and protocols to do the procedures/skills needed that are not allowed for others to perform.

Why not have the Flight nurse obtain the CFRN instead of the CEN?
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#8 Loydster

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Posted 16 June 2008 - 04:02 AM

The platform in which most companies run at in California is based upon the money they spend. EMTs cost less than paramedics. California does not have EMT-Bs or EMT-IIs any longer (for many years). So most CCT buses run on a BLS platform. AMR in Northern Calif tried to go to one EMT and 1 RN (only 2 persons) crew. Thus the RNs went nuts, formed a union, and AMR in northern Cali runs 2 EMTs with the RN. You may still run across ALS CCT platforms, but these are usually the smaller companies that still have thoughts of delivering good quality care. But if you go to Oregon, CCT is two paramedics, or EMT-P and a less certified crew like a EMTB. CCT units rarely run with a RN due to the EMT-P has a greatly expanded scope of practice and high level of education mandated by the state and local regions.
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#9 nursemedic

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Posted 12 July 2008 - 06:09 PM

I have worked ground CCT for 3 years in Ohio. We currently run a CICP (Certified Intensive Care Paramedic), a RN, and our driver is either a Basic or Advanced EMT. Our program requires all staffing to go through the CICP class minus the Basic who does have to sit in on some of the classes to have an understanding of the equipment that we use. Our medics and RN's have to have at least 3years experience. In the next few months we are launching our new rotor wing service that will work along with our ground MICU unit. When this launches the CICP's will required to obtain there FP-C and the RN's there CCRN or CEN. Our service has been running ground MICU for about 10 years. I can't understand why anyone would want to have a ground unit running with a EMT-B and a RN what happens if the patients goes down the tube and needs a ETT, can the nurse do that, I know here they can't. It just sounds really weird to me. We did run duel medic and RN but switched due to a shortage of Medics in our area. Is the protocol in Cali that bad.



Many Ohio RNs intubate as part of their transport responsibilities. This must be your service's policy. Although I have not read every post on this thread, the one thing that strikes me (and I addressed it in another ground CCT post) is the lack of standards and standardization...even worse for ground than HEMS. This is an area that ground providers can work on to become more meaningful providers of critical care transport and take back some of that business from air operators. Go team!
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Greg