Flightmed archive for April-2002
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Flightmed archive for April-2002



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Re: Fw: I am furious and it isnt EMTALA [long]



Hold on.....
Before we go off half cocked, read the letters from Steve Young, National President of the Grand lodge of Fraternal Order of Police written to Sen Leahy and the NY Times, and Sen. Leahy's statements.
paul




GRAND LODGE
FRATERNAL ORDER OF POLICE
309 Massachusetts Ave., N.E.

                                    Washington, DC 2000215
April 2002

Col Allen
Editor-in-Chief
New York Post
1211 Sixth Avenue
New York, NY 10036

Dear Editor:

I understand that, in the news business, it is important to be first. But what good is being first if you are also wrong?

I am writing on behalf of the Fraternal Order of Police to demand an apology for inaccurate statements made in your newspaper with respect to the "Public Safety Medal of Valor Act" and the role Senator Patrick J. Leahy, Chairman of the Committee on the Judiciary, played and continues to play in our ongoing effort to honor the public safety officers who lost their lives on September 11. You obviously wrote that piece to get people angry – and it worked – only it’s our nation’s law enforcement officer’s who are angry.

To use the fallen officers of September 11 and the families they left behind to make a political attack is reprehensible in the extreme. I can only hope you did so out of ignorance and sloppy reporting, rather than by intent.

The F.O.P. originally conceived the idea of a medal awarded by the President in the name of Congress, and worked closely with Senator Leahy and his staff to draft and ultimately pass, the "Public Safety Officers’ Medal of Valor Act." Without Senator Leahy’s leadership on this issue, President Bush would not have had the opportunity to sign the bill into law.

The Post chose to ignore this fact and erroneously reported that Senator Leahy is blocking efforts to award the men and women who lost their lives in the attacks of September 11 the Medal of Valor. This is completely wrong. Our goal – and Senator Leahy’s goal – when drafting the "Medal of Valor Act," was to make sure the legislation eliminated politics from the process. The Post seems determined to make political hay and big headlines by inaccurately describing a law we worked hard to pass and the process by which public safety officers – not politicians – honor their own.

There was never any question that the men and women of September 11 would be honored – the question is how. I know this to be a fact because, since the attacks, Senator Leahy has involved the F.O.P. at every point in the decision- and policy-making process.

While the F.O.P. deeply appreciates numerous resolutions before the Congress urging that the Medal of Valor be awarded to all those public safety officers who lost their lives in the attack on the United States last September, all such resolutions are nonbinding. Action or inaction on these resolutions has absolutely no impact on whether or not the officers of September 11 will be honored with the Medal of Valor. Whether the Post failed to understand this or just didn’t want to let the facts get in the way of a good story, is something only you can answer.

Had your reporter read the "Medal of Valor Act" or contacted the F.O.P., he would have known that the statute specifically allows the U.S. Attorney General to waive the statutory limitation on recipients in extraordinary situations. Senator Leahy knows this, the F.O.P. knows this, but, apparently, the Post does not know it or did not care to place a simple phone call in an effort to find out.

I believe the Post has a responsibility to find out and report the facts. You failed to do this, and I believe you owe the law enforcement community an apology.

Sincerely,
Steve Young
National President



GRAND LODGE
FRATERNAL ORDER OF POLICE
309 Massachusetts Ave., N.E.


Washington, DC 2000215

April 2002T
The Honorable Patrick J. Leahy
Chairman, Committee on the Judiciary
United States Senate
Washington, D.C. 20510

Dear Mr. Chairman,

I am writing on behalf of the membership of the Fraternal Order of Police to offer our support and gratitude for your ongoing efforts to recognize and honor the heroic acts and sacrifices made by our nation’s law enforcement officers, specifically those who gave their lives on September 11, 2001.  

Recent newspaper articles which mischaracterize your role and commitment to these efforts have caused a good deal of unfounded concern in the public safety community.

When the F.O.P. originally conceived the idea of a medal awarded by the President in the name of Congress, you and your staff worked closely with us to draft and ultimately pass, the "Public Safety Officers’ Medal of Valor Act." The creation of the Medal of Valor Board, its configuration and role in the selection of the officers to be honored, was meant to ensure that the medals would be presented to officers who had exhibited extraordinary courage. The aim of the law you helped author was to recognize the heroism and dedication to duty that public safety officers demonstrate in the line of duty, as determined by a board of their public safety colleagues. Your commitment to this concept goes beyond the mere passage of the legislation.

Since the President signed the bill last year, you have maintained constant communication with the F.O.P. about the make-up of the Board and your staff has worked hard to ensure that the law was being implemented in the right way. Since the attacks on the United States last September, you have demonstrated again and again that you are there for our nation’s law enforcement officers. You have included the F.O.P. in your decision-making process about how best to honor the memories of those public safety officers who lost their lives on September 11. More than that, you have led every effort to get help to the families of all public safety officers’ who lost a loved one – no matter what the date.

The men and women in policing and the Fraternal Order of Police, know the degree and extent of your commitment to public safety officers and no newspaper article will change this fact.

The F.O.P. deeply appreciates the Congressional sentiment that the Medal of Valor be awarded to all those public safety officers who lost their lives in the attack on the United States last September. As you know, the Medal of Valor Act specifically allows the U.S. Attorney General to waive the statutory limitation on recipients in extraordinary situations. I can think of no other way to describe the events of last September. We strongly believe that the Attorney General will waive the limitation, just as the Medal of Valor Board will no doubt recommend.

You, as a former law enforcement officer yourself, have long been a champion for law enforcement and have proven that again and again in the months since September 11. On behalf of the more than 300,000 members of the Fraternal Order of Police, I offer my thanks and sincere gratitude for your leadership on law enforcement issues. We look forward to continuing our strong relationship to better the lives and honor the memories of our nation’s public safety officers.

Sincerely,
Steve Young
National President
cc: Frank Ferreyra, President, New York State Lodge

____________________________________________________________________


_________________________________________

Statement Of Senator Patrick Leahy,
Chairman Senate Judiciary Committee,
Executive Business Meeting
On The Public Safety Officer Medal Of Valor

April 18, 2002

On today’s agenda, I have listed three Sense of Congress resolutions introduced by Representative Joe Crowley, Senator Tom Harkin and Senator Ted Stevens, respectively, to honor the police officers, firefighters and emergency personnel who responded to the terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001. Senator Kennedy, Senator Hatch, Senator Feingold, Senator Grassley, Senator Schumer, Senator Edwards, and Senator McConnell on the committee are all cosponsors of one or the other or both Senate resolutions.

I want to thank Senator Schumer, in particular, for his strong support of these resolutions to honor the fallen September 11 first responders with the Public Safety Officer Medal of Valor.

There were so many examples of bravery and sacrifice on September 11, and I’m sure all of us on this Committee agree that all the extraordinary heroism of our police officers, firefighters and emergency personnel should be recognized with the Public Safety Officer Medal of Valor. The courage and sacrifice brought to the fore on September 11 is exactly what we intended this medal to honor, and the heroes of September 11 are what this medal program is all about.

Last year, I was proud to work with Senator Stevens, Senator Hatch and other members of the committee to enact the legislation, which I cosponsored, that chartered this program by authorizing the President to award and present the Medal of Valor to public safety officers, upon the selection and recommendation of the Medal of Valor Review Board, for extraordinary valor above and beyond the call of duty. We worked closely with the Fraternal Order of Police and other public safety organizations in drawing the charter for a medal that we all want to have exceptional meaning and durability and credibility.

Well before the terrorist attacks, Congress and the President decided that the award would have the most meaning, endurance and credibility if firefighters and police and other public safety officers themselves –– the peers of those who will be honored –– made the selections of candidates.

Now that the President has appointed all 11 members of the Medal of Valor Review Board and the Board met for the first time late last month, I believe it is appropriate for the Committee and the full Senate to consider these Medal of Valor resolutions.

In the long term, it will be best for the medal’s credibility if the award returns at some point to a peer-selection process so that firefighters, police and other public safety officers themselves select candidates. But because of the extraordinary circumstances of September 11, Congress may itself choose to step into the process this year, and we all acknowledge the extraordinary nature of the terrorist attacks. As one who helped create this award and as Chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee, it has been my view that the Public Safety Medal of Valor should be awarded to all the public safety heroes of September 11th, however that is achieved.

I look forward to continuing to work in a bipartisan manner with members of the committee on legislation to support our nation’s public safety officers who put their lives at risk every day to protect us.

I ask that we adopt the Public Safety Officers Medal of Valor resolutions en bloc.
















In a message dated 4/19/02 10:04:18 AM Central Daylight Time, gcims@charter.net writes:


----- Original Message -----
From: "Cims, Gary" <GCims@rmhllc.com>
To: <GCims@Charter.net>
Sent: Friday, April 19, 2002 10:52 AM
Subject: FW: I am furious and it isnt EMTALA


>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: sfrew@medlaw.com
> Sent: Thu 4/18/2002 1:34 AM
> To: Cims, Gary
> Cc:
> Subject: I am furious and it isnt EMTALA
>
>
>
> This is not an EMTALA E-Bulletin, so if you
> not wish to read this, please feel free to
> trash this email, because I am FURIOUS...
>
> If you know or respect a firefighter, police
> officer, or EMS person, then I think
> you ought to know about this...
>
> As you may recall, on 9-11 hundreds of
> firefighers, law enforcement personnel, civil
> servants, and EMS personnel died in a valiant
> attempt to save people in the Twin Towers. Many
> more endangered themselves to try to save the
> lives of citizens and fellow rescuers.
>
> A short time ago, the US House of Representatives
> voted 409-0 to award those people the new national
> civilian award created shortly before this
> national day of tragedy -- the Presidential Medal
> of Valor.  Now, I am not sure why Congress gets
> to decide who the President gives medals to, but
> hey...whatever it takes.
>
> We, the national unity facade is gone, and in one
> of the most arrogant, callous, and downright
> despicable actions from a politician in a long
> line of some pretty scummy things politicians have
> done, ONE US SENATOR has vetoed the medals and the
> US Senate will not even get to vote on it, according
> to the NY Post (nypost.com.)
>
> Sen Patrick Leahy is the chairman of the Senate
> committee that received the bill from the House,
> and he has decided he will not allow the bill
> through his committee to reach the Senate for a
> vote.
>
> I, for one, am more than FURIOUS. It is important
> that we recognize our heros from the 9-11
> attack in as many ways as possible, so it is
> certainly unfortunate that they will not have
> this small piece of recognition and gratitude.
> What I find totally reprehensible is that one
> politician can be so partisan, so manipulative,
> and so addicted to power that they would dare
> to even think of such an affront to these
> public safety personnel, let alone act upon such
> a thought.
>
> I for one am emailing this "Honorable Senator
> from Vermont".  If you wish to join me, his
> email address is senator_leahy@leahy.senate.gov.
>
> Steve Frew











































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