Flightmed archive for April-2002
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Flightmed archive for April-2002



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RE: stable neonate transports




I see your point but don't concede it, most services can send at least an
EMT along, or a volunteer member if they are that small...its just a matter
of organizational will.
Robert S. "Steve" Cole
Paramedic, CCEMTP
Education Department
Ada County Paramedics 
208-375-7079
emcolers@adaweb.net

"...A mind stretched with new ideas never regains its former shape"


-----Original Message-----
From: wcemt@terraworld.net [mailto:wcemt@terraworld.net]
Sent: Sunday, March 31, 2002 10:03 PM
To: flightmed@flightweb.com
Subject: RE: stable neonate transports


I agree that more hands are always better but for many 
small rural services the extra hands just aren't there, 
regardless of money, and to take additional personnel out 
of the loop for 2-6 hours isn't always an option.  The 
service I worked for was in this situation.  With only 8 
full-time paramedics we did what we had to do.  However, we 
always kept "plan-B' ready!  While we would take these 
critical care transfers with only one medic in the back we 
would call for a helicopter intercept if things started 
going south.  And if a helicopter was not available, we got 
the closet ground unit to meet with us for extra help.  I 
see nothing wrong with a single medic taking a CCT as long 
as they are aware of their limitations and have a back-up 
plan (or two) ready if needed.  

Wesley Copeland


>  as a side note, I agree with the posting whole 
heartedly...I have seen a
> couple of "critical care transport" ground agencies with 
only one provider
> in back, while a medic is good at handling crisis, medics 
do not have 8
> arms.  People will say a medic is used to working alone 
but in 11 years I
> have never worked a critical pt alone, I have always 
grabbed a fire fighter,
> my partner, a cop, or even a bystander to help.  (Any 
good medic can give a
> 15 second class on CPR or squeezing a bag when 
needed :))  So why do some
> services insist on sending CCT level transports with only 
one person in
> back, no matter their qualifications? ($$$$$)
> 
> 
> Robert S. "Steve" Cole
> Paramedic, CCEMTP
> Education Department
> Ada County Paramedics 
> 208-375-7079
> emcolers@adaweb.net
> 
> "...A mind stretched with new ideas never regains its 
former shape"
> 
> 
> -----Original Message-----
> From: James J. Misuraca 
[mailto:James.J.Misuraca@Hitchcock.ORG]
> Sent: Sunday, March 31, 2002 6:50 AM
> To: flightmed@flightweb.com
> Subject: Re: stable neonate transports
> 
> 
> If an individual  is trained to do a job then it 
shouldn't be any EMTALA
> violation; MD, RN, Medic.
> They're all valid licensures.
> My question is if you're transporting a "stable" infant 
(and I assume that
> given that this child is not going home and on to another 
medical center)
> if there is a problem, is a single caregiver adequete? 
I'm not making
> accusations about individual capabilities (and there are 
some amazing folks
> out there) but as a standard of practice is it safe to 
send a partial team?
> 
> Jim MIsuraca, RN CCRN
> DHART
> 
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